Gethin Jenkins out of the Six Nations

first_img Gethin Jenkins is likely to miss the whole of the Six Nations after confirming he’ll have an operation on Wednesday, which will keep him out until the end of March.Key player Jenkins will have surgery to rectify a toe injury  and is likely to be replaced by Paul James as Wales seek to shore up their scrum with a man who has been an automatic choice in the last few seasons. CARDIFF, WALES – NOVEMBER 06: Gethin Jenkins of Wales looks on during the anthems before the Test match between Wales and the Australian Wallabies at Millennium Stadium on November 6, 2010 in Cardiff, Wales. (Photo by Scott Heavey/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Cardiff Blues Wales coach Warren Gatland is already without banned scrum-half Richie Rees for the whole Six Nations Championship and Shane Williams is racing to be fit for the Championship opener against England on 4 February.The decision has been made now so Jenkins will be fit for Cardiff Blues’ end of season run-in and the World Cup.last_img read more

Ireland rue missed opportunities

first_img“It may have been an improved performance but we’re there to get a win. We need to keep playing in this way (scoring tries), but get better at what we’re doing.”O’Driscoll urged his team-mates to step up to the plate, and called on Ireland’s outsiders to help improve the standard within the squad.“We’re not being clinical and that’s what’s killing us, but there are factors within our control, like individual errors,” said O’Driscoll. “Guys have to look at their own individual performances and the errors they made, and there needs to be pressure on the starting 15 from the other players – you need to up your game or you’ll be replaced.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS THREE POINTS would have brought the scores level, a try would have won Ireland the game. Last week against Italy Ronan O’Gara split the posts with just three minutes to go, but despite a capacity crowd at the Aviva Stadium willing a repeat performance, the scores remained 22-25 for the last 11 minutes, leaving the fans, players and management regretting what could have been a significant victory for Ireland.The hosts lost despite scoring three tries to France’s one, but ill-discipline cost them dearly and left France still well in the game at the break. French scrum-half Morgan Parra’s 100% kicking rate meant the score was 15-12 going in at half-time, with everything to play for.Captain Brian O’Driscoll blamed his team’s high penalty count for the defeat, and said: “It was a kick in the teeth. We could have won, but unforced errors cost us today. Goal-kicking is a huge part of the game and ill discipline can be punished. It’s difficult to take.”The majority of France’s points were kicked by Morgan Parra and replacement Dimitri Yachvili, while Fergus McFadden, Tomás O’Leary and Jamie Heaslip all crossed for Ireland but this brought no consolation to Declan Kidney and his men.“There were positives but we need to get the results, and the public who pay money to come here and watch want to see results,” said Kidney. “They got too many turnovers and penalties, on the wrong side of the half-way line for us, and it was an opportunity missed. ROME – FEBRUARY 05: Brian O’Driscoll of Ireland during the RBS 6 Nations Championship match between Italy and Ireland at Stadio Flaminio on February 5, 2011 in Rome, Italy. (Photo by Getty Images for RBS) Ireland now have a fortnight to mull over their defeat and a plan of action to adopt against Scotland, and Kidney will be following the advice of his captain, and keeping a close eye on the rugby being played around the country.“Two weeks is a long time and there’s a Magners League round to be played in that time,” said Kidney. “I still have faith in the team, but we need to look at the guys who didn’t start today.”last_img read more

Nigel Melville’s World Cup Verdict

Team USA celebrate after winning the Bowl Final of the Churchill Cup against RussiaThe Eagles’ two warm-up matches against Canada were a bit like England’s games with Wales: we dominated possession for long periods but made silly mistakes and conceded sloppy tries so we lost both.But that’s one of the problems we have in American rugby: we have an athletic squad but a lot of them are still at an early stage of their rugby understanding. We’re growing the whole time as a squad but still lack experience.Obviously for us the big game in New Zealand is the one against Russia. We’ve beaten them the last two times we’ve played them – including in June’s Churchill Cup – but the World Cup will be completely different.The fact we’re playing them is a marketing dream as there’s still an element of the ‘clash of the superpowers’ about any sporting occasion between America and Russia. I remember during the 1980s being glued to the USA v Soviet Union ice hockey clashes in the Olympics, and now we have something similar in rugby.In both this RWC and in 2015, NBC will broadcast a number of games on their main network. That is unbelievable for us and I can’t stress enough the importance of getting rugby into mainstream TV – it will go to more than 100 million homes.What we need next is good ratings to help us establish rugby even more across America.Of course, there’s a risk the Eagles might be well beaten by Australia or Ireland but I don’t think that would upset most Americans. Yes, they like to win but they also like to see great athletes and increasingly America is waking upto the idea that rugby today produces fantastic athletes. They also appreciate what a phenomenon the sport is in many countries and I think the World Cup will show them it’s more important globally than American Football.Playing Australia and Ireland will be tough but we aim to be competitive. I don’t have too many dealings with the on-field side of the Eagles but I know (head coach) Eddie O’Sullivan has a lot of confidence in the squad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS WORCESTER, ENGLAND – JUNE 18: The USA team celebrate after winning the Bowl Final of the Churchill Cup Bowl between Russia and USA at Sixways Stadium on June 18, 2011 in Worcester, England. (Photo by Warren Little/Getty Images) Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit We had great news with the release of the Sports Goods Manufacturing Association 2010 report: it revealed that rugby is now one of the fastest growing team sports in America. That, and the fact that we’ve now got over half a million kids playing ‘Rookie Rugby’, bodes well for the future.When I arrived here in 2006, I realised that some of the things I’d been told about rugby’s development in the US weren’t as accurate as I’d been led to believe!So the first plan I put into operation was to lay a strong foundation for the future by targeting the kids, and we began with the six- to ten-year-olds. Rookie Rugby is like touch rugby and we took it to the schools, and it’s grown and grown.Now rugby is taking off in high schools and colleges, and the final of the college competition last season was played in front of 11,000 fans.It’s these players who’ll play for USA in the next two World Cups, and not only will they be great athletes but they’ll have a far better understanding of the game.This article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK read more

Lions 2013 Player Profile: Alex Corbisiero

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Prop arrival: England’s Alex CorbisieroFAST FACTSClub London IrishAge 24 (30 August 1988)Born New YorkDimensions 6ft 1in & 18st 8lbCountry EnglandTest caps 18 Point to prove: Alex Corbisiero took five flights to travel from Salta to Brisbane and join up with the LionsTHE ENGLAND prop showed significant improvements in 2012 but injury ruined his chances of further development in the 2013 Six Nations and thus he had no chances to impress the Lions coaches. The 24-year-old, who is studying for a history degree, is leaving London Irish for Northampton next season.WHY SELECTEDHe’s improved significantly as a scrummager in recent seasons – Northampton have signed him as a replacement for the impressive Soane Tonga’uiha – and now he’s fully fit he can contribute in the loose too.TEST PROSPECTSMako Vunipola is now the favourite for the starting jersey with Cian Healy and Gethin Jenkins heading home because of injury, but at the very least Corbisiero is in contention for a bench spot for the Test series. It’s all to play for at loosehead in the next three games.GREATEST DAYHis Test debut against Italy in 2011. He was a late call-up to the starting XV after Tim Payne was ruled out with injury, but looked comfortable at the top level as England won 59-13 at Twickenham.IF HE WERE A FOODMeatballs – a substantial package with Italian roots. Test points NoneEvery 2013 Lions player is profiled in the July edition of Rugby World, with Lions legend Sir Ian McGeechan giving his verdict on each member of the squad. It’s on sale now.last_img read more

Rugby books to buy for Christmas

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Need a few ideas for Christmas gifts? Look no further than rugby books. It’s a bumper year for them, starting with a cluster of autobiographies by some heavy hitters… What’s on your list? There’s no shortage of options when buying presents for Christmas (Imogen Pearey) Rugby books to buy for Christmas“Let’s be reasonable and add an eighth day to the week that is devoted exclusively to reading,” said the comedy writer Lena Dunham. You’ll certainly need a few extra days to enjoy the deluge of rugby books that have hit the shelves this autumn.And you might be tempted to ask “Where’s Gregor?” because Scotland’s head coach is alone among the home nation bosses at RWC 2019 in not bringing out an autobiography.In print: Warren Gatland has plenty to say (Getty)Warren Gatland stole a march on his rivals with a 14 November release date for his Pride and Passion (Headline, £20), the New Zealander able to reflect on an extraordinary three decades of success that includes three Wales Grand Slams, two World Cup semi-finals and two unbeaten Lions series.Fellow Kiwi Joe Schmidt provides life lessons and management ideas in Ordinary Joe (Penguin Ireland, £25), a book that The Irish Times calls “an insight into the fascinating personality of the man who has been the most influential figure in Irish rugby over the last decade, or probably any other decade for that matter”.While Schmidt elected to write his book himself, England coach Eddie Jones recruited the award-winning author Donald McRae to pen his life story for the first time.Jones’s book, My Life and Rugby (Macmillan, £20), has been serialised by The Times and includes an admission of selection errors for the recent World Cup final.“I should have chosen Joe Marler ahead of Mako Vunipola at loosehead prop and reverted to the Owen Farrell-Manu Tuilagi-Henry Slade midfield we used against Australia,” he says.“George Ford could have come off the bench when we had got into the game. But you never know until the game starts. You use the best available evidence and rely on your gut.”Supporting role: Joe Marler watches from the touchline during the World Cup final (Getty Images)As a result, Sir Clive Woodward remains the only England coach to land the Webb Ellis Cup and in How to Win (Hodder & Stoughton, £20) he analyses the events of Japan 2019 in a book branded as “the distillation of a philosophy of leadership developed during a lifetime in high-performance environments, from the rugby field to the boardroom”. Woodward’s 2003 book Winning!, published shortly after England’s triumph in Sydney, is still in print.Switching hemispheres, Heroes & Heartbreak (Allen & Unwin, £17.99) is published in New Zealand but will be available on Book Depository and Amazon from 3 December. It follows every beat of the All Blacks campaign in the 12 months up to and including their failed attempt to bag a third successive world crown.“The climax was not the one that the All Blacks wanted, and signals a new era in world rugby. It may prove to be a defining moment for the game in New Zealand as well,” says the promotional literature, enticingly.Not this time: the All Blacks couldn’t make it a World Cup hat-trick – a new book explains why (Getty)The book is written by freelance sportswriter Jamie Wall and he’s also responsible for Brothers in Black (Allen & Unwin, £14.99), which looks at the astounding number of brothers playing top-level rugby in New Zealand.One of the country’s all-time greats, Kieran Read, has bowed out internationally and tells of his experiences in his autobiography Straight 8 (Headline, £20).Welsh rugby fans are also well served this year. Glenn Webbe’s autobiography, The Gloves are Off (Y Lolfa, £9.99), is the story of the 1980s Bridgend wing who became the first black player to play for Wales.Geraint Thomas, co-author of the book, said: “I actually played alongside Glenn for Bridgend in the early ’90s, so I knew as well as being a brilliant player he had a huge personality as well. I will never forget waiting to run out for my Bridgend debut, feeling very nervous, when Glenn turned to me in the tunnel and said, ‘So, are you any good?’ – typical Glenn!”center_img Y Lolfa also have a book out on the outgoing Wales coach. Called Gatland’s Last Bow (£9.99), it’s written by Richard Morgan and will be published in December.We ran a competition for Sam Warburton’s Open Side (HarperCollins, £20), about the mental and physical toll of playing elite-level rugby, when the book came out in September.Behind the Dragon: Playing Rugby for Wales (Polaris, £20) is a history book in the players’ own words, as expertly crafted by Ross Harries, while On to Glory (VSP, £20) is the story of Wales’ 2019 Grand Slam in glorious technicolour. Both were published early this year.Further north, The World According to Doddie (Black & White, £12.99) is a light-hearted collection of mantras, mottos and one-liners from the legendary Doddie Weir. Seeing as we’re in election mode, here’s a suggestion from the book. “Why is there a need for charities?” says the tireless MND campaigner. “Take 10p from everyone, per week, and divide that up amongst all the charities. Revolutionary, eh? Vote Doddie.”Oor Doddie: former Scotland lock Doddie Weir in Dundee with a sculpture created in his honourA Full-back Slower than your Average Prop (Arena, £17.99) is the memoir of former Scotland full-back Ian Smith and takes its title from an unflattering description of him in a book about Scottish rugby! Reviewing the book, Allan Massie said it will “delight readers who remember the amateur days with pleasure and nostalgia, and astonish those too young to have had the good fortune to have known them”.Smith, by the way, is still a practising dentist at the age of 75, living in Norfolk.Unholy Union (Constable, £20) is a fascinating and in-depth analysis of our sport. Author Michael Aylwin and consultant Mark Evans have collaborated on every imaginable topic, from concussion to the salary cap to the struggles of the community game. It’s just one of the books we’ll be featuring in an online competition in the near future.Amberley Publishing in Gloucestershire produced a couple of books this autumn. At Least We Turn Up is the biography of John Pullin, the former England and Lions hooker, while The Lion of the RAF relates the career of George Beamish, a WW2 hero who played for Ireland and the Lions between the wars.Family man: John Pullin, a star of the 1960s and ’70s, combined Test rugby with life as a farmerIf risqué is your thing, Taking it Up the Blindside (DCO Books) is a collection of short stories based on tour antics in Thailand and South-East Asia. Written by Jon Prichard, the Kindle edition is available for less than £7 at the time of writing.Staying in Asia, Tokkie Smith and the Colour of Rugby (Adagio Media, $14.99) is John D’Eathe’s tribute to the founder of the Hong Kong Sevens.The Wooden Spoon Yearbook 2020 (Lennard, £20) is the 24th edition of the fund-raising annual and this year is largely devoted to the World Cup. Sir Ian McGeechan and editor Ian Robertson pick their World Cup XV and include some surprise choices.Related content: Win the Official Review of Japan 2019Some old favourites have been updated. Rugby’s Strangest Matches (Portico, £9.99) by John Griffiths relates some of the sport’s quirky goings-on, while for all you active players, Chic Carvell and Rex Hazeldine have you sorted with Fitness for Winning Rugby (Austin Macauley, £17.99). Alongside core fitness information, it includes chapters on nutrition, injuries and recovery. But don’t expect it to fit in a Christmas stocking!No Borders (Polaris, £14.99) must also be mentioned here. Tom English won the 2016 Rugby Book of the Year with the original version and a newer edition, containing exclusive new material from Ireland players in the wake of their 2018 Grand Slam, was released last year.Finally, something for the youngest readers of all. Ben the Tractor and Friends (David & Charles, £7) is a children’s story produced for Ben Moon’s testimonial. The long-serving Exeter prop, who has eight England caps, is supporting two charities: the Exeter Chiefs Foundation and the Beacon Centre. For the kids: one of Molly Finnegan’s beautiful illustrations from Ben the Tractor and FriendsRugby World has reviewed some of these books and run competitions in the past 12 months – and we’ll be featuring more of these titles in the coming weeks. There’s a lot of good stuff out there, so don’t forget to buy one or two of them for the festive season. Amazon is the most popular one-stop website or you can visit the publishers’ own websites.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

School prepares to celebrate Regan’s life as community pays tribute

first_imgSchool prepares to celebrate Regan’s life as community pays tribute Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Gun Violence Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 8, 2012 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Episcopal School of Jacksonville student shows one of the 3,000 river rocks students painted March 8 to help them grieve the shooting death of Head of School Dale Regan two days earlier. The stones will be given to attendees of a memorial service on campus March 9. Photo/Episcopal School of Jacksonville[Episcopal News Service] While students at Episcopal School of Jacksonville, Florida, gathered March 8 to paint river rocks to help them grieve the murder of Head of School Dale Regan two days earlier, details began to emerge about the former teacher who shot her and then killed himself.Regan often spoke to students at the grade 6-12 school about river rocks as a metaphor for steps along the path of life. The 3,000 stones will be distributed at a “Celebration Memorial Service” planned for March 9 on campus. The students met on the campus Flag Plaza to paint the stones and carefully array them on the steps of the plaza.Regan, 63, died in the early afternoon March 6, a few hours after she had been involved in firing Shane Schumerth, 28, a Spanish teacher at the school. He returned to campus with an AK-47 in a guitar case, went to her office and shot Regan several times before killing himself, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff’s office.Regan had been at Episcopal for 34 years, teaching English before she became head of school.The school said in a statement that Schumerth was “failing to meet the expectations of the school and was repeatedly counseled for issues associated with attendance and a lack of timeliness in complying with the requirements of the position.”The “separation meeting,” the statement said, was held away from students and with a witness.“The employee was informed of the decision to separate in the most compassionate way possible and was offered separation pay,” the statement continued.The Very Rev. Kate Moorehead, dean of St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Jacksonville and vice-chair of the school’s board of trustees, said in the statement that Regan “dearly loved her faculty. She was always intent on not only addressing a situation legally, but in ensuring that we considered the personal impact on the employee. She lived her faith in the way that she led the school.”Schumerth made no threat during the meeting but the school followed its standard practice of escorting him off the campus and informing the security force, which placed a guard at the entrance of the school, according to the statement.Three roads lead to the school and some have gates, according to the Jacksonvile Florida Times-Union newspaper. The school, which has a full time director of safety and security, uses video surveillance and security gates as well as a digital patrol check system that ensures patrols are completed, the school said in its statement.Meanwhile, the newspaper reported that Schumerth brought with him nearly 100 rounds of ammunition for an AK-47 assault rifle he purchased at a Jacksonville gun show early last month. The newspaper attributed the information to an unnamed police source familiar with the investigation.In the semi-automatic version of the rifle a 7.62mm bullet out of a chamber is typically fed from a 30-round clip attached to the bottom of the rifle. Officials said that an AK-47 was a fairly common military weapon and that civilian models can be purchased in gun shops for $400-$500.It’s unlikely anyone will ever know why Shane Schumerth chose Regan as his only target, shooting her as many as 10 times before killing himself, the newspaper’s source said. Investigators have yet to find a note or other indication as to Schumerth’s motive, said the source, who the newspaper said not been authorized to speak publicly about the case.The campus is closed until March 19, in part because spring break had previously been scheduled for the week of March 12. School officials have been providing grief counseling on campus and meetings between students and teachers.Jane Goodwin, whose daughter Casey is in seventh grade, told the Times-Union that the school’s response to the tragedy has reinforced that Episcopal is a good place for Casey.“They kept us updated, and all kinds of faculty have been available to help our kids,” Goodwin said. “It is shocking, but I have no reservations about how it was handled.”Students, parents, alumni and friends of Regan and the school, as well as school officials from all over the country, are leaving condolences on the school’s blog as well as on its Facebook page and elsewhere.“The faculty and students of the Fountain Valley School of Colorado join with their colleagues and peers at Episcopal School and across the nation to mourn this terrible loss of life and leadership. May you find strength together as you celebrate Dale’s life and carry on her good work,” Fountain Valley School of Colorado Headmaster Craig W. Larimer wrote on the school’s blog.Barbara Hodge, executive director of the Florida Council of Independent Schools, in a message to heads of schools in the council, wrote that Regan, who was president of the group, “would have reached out to comfort, to support, to lift up, and to unify the community” in such a situation. Hodges urged FCIS members to “follow the model that Dale beautifully unfolded for us.” She also called for a moment of silence at 11 a.m. EST March 9 as the memorial service at Episcopal begins.Elizabeth Bell Canon called Regan “the person who saw more in me than I saw in myself.”“Because of her, I began to believe that I was capable of mastering truly challenging tasks related to writing and language,” she wrote on the blog. “I ultimately chose a path that led me to become a teacher – and that would not have been doable without her influence at a critical point in my life. Thank you, Mrs. Regan. I promise that I will spend the rest of my professional life trying to live up to the example you set for me when I was a 17 year old girl.”A Times-Union columnist, Mark Woods, wrote March 8 about a Dec. 2010 email Regan sent him after he had written about some Episcopal parents who filed a lawsuit after the school lost a football playoff game. Regan and the school made it clear they wanted no part of the suit and had told the parents and their employees just that.“As you can imagine this has not been the best week for me or our school,” Regan wrote in the email that Woods said were now chilling, powerful and poignant. “No school head would be proud to have their school on the front pages as ours has been this week. But, I really want to thank you for your article. Again, I wish an Episcopal parent and employee weren’t part of your subject, but rightfully they were. And your message was excellent.”Regan went on to say that “children are precious and important, but parenting needs to be patient, level-headed, loving and long-ranged rather than a ‘let me see what I can do to make everything all right for you,’” she wrote, adding that parents, educators and coaches have to be partners in “teach[ing] life lessons that sometimes are difficult.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Un grupo de diócesis quiere cambios en el plan de…

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Un grupo de diócesis quiere cambios en el plan de salud denominacional Las resoluciones abordan costos y predicen impactos New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 22, 2012 Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] Preocupadas por las realidades económicas que conllevan la implementación de un plan de seguro de salud para toda la denominación, al menos cuatro diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal están solicitando formalmente de la 77ª. Convención General —que sesionará en julio de este año— que cambie los términos del programa que ha de ponerse en vigor menos de seis meses después que la Convención concluya.La Diócesis de Nueva York Central ha presentado una resolución en la oficina de la Convención General para que la Convención difiera por tres años la fecha límite de participación fijada para el 1 de enero de 2013. La resolución también permitiría que esas entidades obligadas canónicamente a participar, adquirieran seguro de salud de otros proveedores además del Episcopal Medical Trust, [la agencia] afiliada al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia (CPF por su sigla en inglés) que ha sido designada para administrar el programa.La Diócesis de Ohio también ha propuesto una resolución a la Convención General para eliminar la ordenanza de comprarle el seguro al Medical Trust.La Diócesis de Carolina del Norte quiere que la Convención General exija un estudio “del impacto [que tendría] el acatamiento pleno de la Resolución 2009-A177”. Y la resolución haría que la Convención no le exigiera a ninguna diócesis adoptar las normas mínimas de costos compartidos para alcanzar la paridad entre clérigos y empleados laicos que contempla el plan hasta que la próxima reunión de la Convención en 2015 haya llevado a cabo un estudio al respecto.La Diócesis de Misurí Occidental solicita que la fecha de entrada en vigor sea suspendida y que la Convención instruya al Medical Trust  a crear “un solo plan nacional unificado para toda la Iglesia Episcopal sin variaciones en los costos de primas de una diócesis a otra, y eliminando de este modo las dramáticas diferencias de costos para seguros de salud semejantes entre diócesis y regiones de la Iglesia Episcopal”.Otras diócesis episcopales han aprobado resoluciones en que instan a cambios en el plan, pero no han llegado a presentar o a planear presentar “resoluciones C” en la oficina de la Convención General como han hecho las otras cuatro.Sumado a esto, miembros de la Cámara de Obispos que integran el grupo de las Diócesis Pequeñas han pedido al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia que contemple un cambio importante en el plan. El pedido se produjo después que funcionarios del CPF se reunieron con ellos en noviembre de 2011, según dio a conocer este organismo.“Aunque una sola tasa no forma parte de la resolución, a petición de la Cámara de Obispos, el Medical Trust está estudiando las implicaciones de una sola tasa sobre los costos de los beneficios de salud”, dijeron Frank Armstrong, primer vicepresidente y gerente general de Medical Trust,  y Laurie Kazilionis, vicepresidente para las relaciones con los clientes de esta institución, en una declaración por escrito que enviaron por correo electrónico a Episcopal News Service.Una decisión de la Convención General en 2009 suscita las preocupacionesLas preocupaciones expresadas están dirigidas a una decisión que hiciera la Convención General en julio de 2009 cuando, vía Resolución A177, instruye al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia que ponga en vigor un plan de salud para toda la denominación (DHP, por su sigla en inglés) a partir del 1 de enero de 2013, cuyos beneficios han de ser provistos a través del Medical Trust. Parte de los fundamentos para esa decisión era que ese plan ahorraría dinero, mitigaría las inequidades entre empleados laicos y mejoraría el acceso de los empleados al seguro de salud.A partir del 1 de enero [de 2013], las diócesis, congregaciones (incluidas las catedrales, parroquias y misiones), así como ciertas agencias oficiales de la Iglesia están obligadas a proporcionarle beneficios de seguro de salud a todos los clérigos y empleados laicos que trabajen 1.500 horas o más al año (30 horas por semana) en las diócesis nacionales de la Iglesia (incluidas Puerto Rico y las Islas Vírgenes). Los empleados que trabajen 20 horas o más a la semana pueden participar voluntariamente conforme a las normas que sus empleadores fijen.Estos requisitos no darán lugar a un gran cambio en muchas diócesis.  A partir de enero de 2012, según el CPF, 93 de las 101 diócesis de la Iglesia en el territorio nacional, así como otras 45 agrupaciones están inscritas en uno de los 22 planes de salud del Medical Trust  que se ofrecen bajo el DHP. Esas inscripciones  se “basaron en el atractivo del producto y del precio”, dijo el CPF en la declaración. Setenta y ocho de esa 93 diócesis han estado con el Medical Trust desde antes de 2009.Conforme al plan, las diócesis toman sus propias decisiones respecto a qué planes de salud del Medical Trust ofrecen, si ofrecen o no beneficios de salud a parejas conyugales no casadas y si las escuelas, las guarderías infantiles y otras instituciones diocesanas están obligadas a participar.El Medical Trust es lo que se conoce como un plan autofinanciado de la Iglesia y es el proveedor de beneficios mediante su asociación con compañías de seguros de salud tales como Cigna, Kaiser, Aetna, United Healthcare y Empire BlueCross BlueShield. En la actualidad ofrece acceso en la red al 98 por ciento de los empleados de la Iglesia Episcopal en toda la nación, según el CPF. Los 22 diferentes planes de Medical Trust incluyen salud mental, oftalmología, programa de asistencia al empleado y beneficios de derecho a la salud. También se cuentan con planes de salud dental.Los empleados pueden optar si han de recibir beneficios de salud a través de una fuente lícita, tal como el empleo de un cónyuge o compañero/a, beneficios del servicio militar o cobertura de un empleador anterior.La Resolución A177 y el canon que la pone en vigor exigen que cada diócesis establezca una póliza de compartir costos que sea la misma para empleados clérigos y laicos con derechos. La póliza determina la cantidad mínima que una congregación debe contribuir como prima mensual para clérigos y empleados laicos  que reúnan los requisitos necesarios. Las diócesis que ya hayan instituido o formulado pólizas de compartir gastos han elegido opciones que oscilan desde obligar a que los empleadores sufraguen el costo total de un plan específico a exigir que todos los empleados paguen un porcentaje de cualquier plan o de un plan específico.La preocupación por los costos que conlleva la puesta en práctica del DHP se exacerba por el hecho de que la Iglesia también se enfrenta a otra fecha límite el 1 de enero de 2013. La Convención General de 2009 también hizo canónicamente obligatorio a los empleadores inscribir a todos los empleados laicos que deban trabajar un mínimo de 1.000 horas anualmente para cualquier organización de la Iglesia Episcopal en EE.UU. o cualquier organización o cuerpo sujeto a la autoridad de la Iglesia en un plan de pensión para empleados laicos auspiciado por el CPF. Las excepciones son los empleadores episcopales que ofrezcan beneficios de pensión a través de un plan de beneficios equivalente no auspiciado por el CPF y de las escuelas que ofrecen beneficios de pensiones a través de un plan de contribución definido de los fondos de jubilación para maestros y profesores, que se conoce abreviadamente en inglés como TIAA-CREF.La mayoría de los empleadores del clero de la Iglesia Episcopal tienen la obligación desde 1917  de contribuir al CPF para las pensiones de los sacerdotes. La tasa actual es de un 18 por ciento del paquete de compensación total del clérigo (salario, vivienda,  servicios públicos y reembolsos tributarios de la Seguridad Social). El sistema de pensión de los laicos requerirá una contribución máxima de un nueve por ciento, dependiendo del plan elegido.El CPF predijo en su informe de viabilidad a la Convención General de 2009 que la Iglesia como un todo podría ahorrar $134 millones en los primeros seis años (a partir de 2013) después que el plan de salud denominacional totalmente implementado reemplace el actual sistema de seguro voluntario y fragmentado.Jim Morrison, vicepresidente ejecutivo del CPF y funcionario jefe de operaciones de negocios riesgosos, le dijo a ENS en un comunicado que el plan para toda la denominación, que en la actualidad, antes de la fecha límite del 2013,  sólo se ha puesto en práctica parcialmente, ya ha resultado en lo que él llamó “contención de costos acumulativos”; es decir, ahorros sobre las tasas prevalentes de más del ocho por ciento o $34,5 millones del 2010 hasta el presente. El Medical Trust pudo negociar con los vendedores antes del comienzo formal de la implementación del PDS y de este modo  añadió $2 millones en ahorros en 2009. Él dijo que esos ahorros han pasado por aumentos de las tasas anuales más bajas de las diócesis participantes de 2009 a 2012.Armstrong y Kazilionis agregaron que el  Medical Trust está maximizando la contención de costos a través de una compra interdenominacional, “ejerciendo influencia en las negociaciones con los vendedores, y optimizando los descuentos de proveedores [de servicios] y farmacias.Morrison comparó el rendimiento del DHP a la experiencia de los empleadores en EE.UU. de 2010 a 2012, quienes, según explicó, vieron aumentar las primas de los seguros de salud en un promedio de un ocho a un 12 por ciento anualmente, mientras los aumentos del Medical Trust promediaron sólo de un 5,5 a un 5,8 por ciento anualmente durante el mismo período.Ejemplo de una diócesisLa experiencia de la Diócesis de Newark en empezar a implementar el DHP ilustra de alguna manera las inquietudes que están planteando algunas diócesis.El Comité Asesor del Obispo sobre Recursos Humanos  y Beneficios, propuso en septiembre que a las congregaciones de Newark se les exigiera pagar un mínimo de un 90 por ciento del costo de una cobertura sencilla para el plan de precio promedio que se ofrecía. La propuesta fue recibida con firme resistencia de parte del clero diocesano, quienes dijeron que el mínimo de costos compartidos reducía esencialmente sus salarios y los obligaba a pagar aún más para asegurar a cónyuges o parejas e hijos.La Rda. Stephanie Wethered, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de San Pedro [St. Peter`s] en Essex Fells, Nueva Jersey, dijo a ENS en una entrevista que no encontraba “ningún sentido empresarial o moral” en exigirles a todos los clérigos diocesanos que enfrentaran una reducción potencial de salarios o beneficios, o ambas cosas a fin de garantizar que un puñado de parroquias “hicieran lo correcto” y aseguraran a sus empleados laicos que tuvieran ese derecho.La parroquia de San Pedro cubrió completamente los costos de proporcionarle a ella (Wethered) y a sus cuatro empleados laicos de jornada completa, seguro de salud, de discapacidad a corto plazo y de vida, beneficios de pensión y una cuenta de ahorros de salud. Ella agregó que la parroquia compra su seguro de salud por menos dinero fuera del Medical Trust y en consecuencia ella se opone a la obligación de que los participantes compren el seguro a través de esa agencia.Un plan para presentar la propuesta del costo compartido en la convención diocesana de enero se archivó a favor de una convención especial sobre el tema el 9 de junio. Al anunciar la convención especial, el obispo Mark Beckwith dijo que hay “algunos problemas esenciales de justicia en brindarles paridad de beneficios al clero y a los laicos que trabajan para la Iglesia” y añadió que hay también “algunas importantes realidades financieras que deben considerarse”. Dijo además que la propuesta del comité había buscado un equilibrio entre lo que llamó “justicia y realidad económica”.Wethered le dijo a  ENS que ella está “animada” por recientes mejoras que el comité asesor le había hecho a la propuesta que se presentará ante la Convención. Si bien la propuesta del 10 por ciento de costos compartidos sigue estando sobre la mesa, el grupo ya ha propuesto formas alternativas de lograr la paridad en la financiación.En enero, la convención diocesana anual le pidió a la Convención General que retrasara la fecha límite de la implementación. El lenguaje se hacía eco de una resolución de octubre de 2011 en la Diócesis de Olimpia.Predicciones de consecuencias imprevistasLos que abogan por cambios en el plan no sólo se preocupan de que las formas en que las diócesis  fijen sus políticas de costos compartidos podría dar lugar a una efectiva reducción de salarios de aquellos a quienes sus empleadores pagan completamente sus beneficios en la actualidad. También sugieren que los empleadores  escogerán el estándar mínimo como el estándar máximo y en consecuencia sus beneficios se verán reducidos.“Es increíblemente ingenuo creer que [el liderazgo congregacional] no usaría ese mandato para liberarse de esa carga” que el costo del seguro de salud pone sobre los presupuestos durante “estos tiempos realmente difíciles en términos económicos”, añadió Wethered.Dos miembros de la Diócesis de Carolina del Este dijeron a ENS en una entrevista telefónica que las instrucciones de la A177 son económicamente agobiantes. Monty Pollard de la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo [St. Paul’s] en Greenville, Carolina del Norte, dice “no es que no nos importen nuestros empleados, sino que es un asunto de dólares y centavos” para las congregaciones que están tratando de ser “disciplinadas” en la administración de sus presupuestos.Dave Whichard dijo que muchos miembros de sus parroquias no pueden proporcionarles a sus familias el mismo nivel de cobertura que la diócesis dice que debe ofrecerse a los empleados parroquiales. “Uno debería tener alguna paridad allí también, me parece a mí”, él dijo.La convención  de Carolina del Este le ha pedido a su diputación a la Convención General que apoye los empeños por aplazar la fecha de implementación y hacer el plan “más verdaderamente denominacional al abordar asuntos tales como el número de categorías que establecen los costos de tal seguro y la falta de un solo grupo nacional de participantes”.De regreso a Newark, el Rdo. Thomas Matthews, rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas [St. Luke’s] en Phillipsburg, Nueva Jersey, quien escuchó parte del debate sobre la A177 en 2009, dijo que los planes de implementación de algunas diócesis parecen estar usando las instrucciones de la resolución como “un botón de reencendido sobre cómo cubrir juntos a clérigos y laicos”. Él quiere ver que la reunión de 2012 de la Convención General estipule que la A177 no se proponía dar lugar a una “reducción de los beneficios [del clero] como un medio para extender beneficios al laicado”.La Diócesis de Misurí abordó específicamente esa inquietud durante su convención de noviembre de 2011 al decir que los empleadores de la diócesis “no reducirán  la cobertura existente ni aumentarán los costos de la cobertura existente para que los empleados acaten la A177.Matthews y Wethered sugirieron también, en palabras de Matthews, que “algunos laicos van a ver disminuidas sus horas [de trabajo] de manera que las iglesias no tengan que pagar por ello”, porque entonces caerían por debajo de la  definición de idoneidad.“Puede que tengan que reducir el número de empleados por cuenta de esos mandatos y eso es una vergüenza”, dijo Wethered.Y la Diócesis de Texas ha preguntado si la Iglesia debería cambiar su enfoque sobre el seguro de salud cuando Estados Unidos también está implantando una reforma en el seguro. Entre las conclusiones que un equipo de trabajo detalló en una carta dirigida a la diócesis en octubre pasado estaba la sugerencia de que en la Convención General de julio “se revisara seriamente” el plan de salud denominacional tendiendo en cuenta tanto “los costos como de la complejidad de la implementación” del plan y las implicaciones de la reforma de salud federal. El equipo de trabajo sugirió que la diócesis se abstuviera de tomar decisiones sobre la cobertura y contribuciones hasta después de la reunión de la Convención en julio.Una declaración del CPF enviada por correo electrónico a ENS decía que la Iglesia aún necesitará el Plan de Salud Denominacional para ayudar en la contención de costos independientemente de las reformas sanitarias federales. Armstrong  y Kazilionis dijeron que hay varias cláusulas específicas de la ley federal que pueden tener repercusión en la Iglesia. “Estamos trabajando con otras denominaciones  a través de la Church [Benefits] Alliance para determinar cómo los grupos que participan en los planes de salud Medical Trust pueden verse afectados”, afirmaron.Ellos también reconocieron que hay problemas “relacionados con el costo de vida, estándares salariales y  planes de beneficios que siempre han sido una inquietud para la Iglesia” y agregaron que el Medical Trust “alienta y facilita la comunicación en el nivel del liderazgo diocesano para abordar esto”.Morrison dijo en sus comentarios por e-mail que el CPF es “muy sensible a las preocupaciones sobre los costos en torno a la Iglesia” y reconoce que el paisaje económico había cambiado notablemente desde que se llevara a cabo un estudio de viabilidad antes de que se reuniera la Convención General en 2009.“Reconocemos que muchas diócesis, congregaciones e instituciones eclesiásticas están experimentando tensiones económicas  debido al estado de la economía de EE.UU., que ha declinado desde la última convención General”, afirmó.En esa misma declaración, Morrison dijo que él “no estaba seguro de que estas resoluciones serán recibidas en la Convención General, pero como agentes de la Iglesia Episcopal, respaldaremos el resultado, sea cual sea”.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es editora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img

Bishops end convention with busy legislative session

first_img July 19, 2012 at 9:38 pm I read with interest the leading paragraph in this report that said, “The House of Bishops wrapped up its business on July 12….on topics as wide ranging as genetically modified crops….” As an animal scientist working to bring safe, ground-breaking and innovative technologies to the marketplace, I was stunned by the lack of information on this globally important topic that will clearly help with doubling food production by the year 2050, as we will need to do according to the United Nations’ Food & Agriculture Organization (motto “Fiat Panis” (“let there be bread”)lp. A search of this site did not reveal what action(s) this Convention took on this issue. What happened and does my Church support this viable, scientifically defensible and safe form of production? After all, Christ speaks to me as to us all by saying, “Feed my sheep.”. I am disappointed in this report and its lead-in paragraphp Featured Jobs & Calls Bishops end convention with busy legislative session Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release By Pat McCaughan and Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 12, 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service [Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The House of Bishops wrapped up its business July 12, the last official day of the 77th General Convention in Indianapolis, considering more than 60 resolutions on topics as wide-ranging as genetically modified food crops to the DREAM Act to social media and implementation of the Episcopal Church Medical Trust.“We have labored long and hard and fruitfully and in a Christian manner,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori told the gathering after the meeting officially adjourned about 5:30 p.m. “I really want to commend this house for the care you have taken for each other and of each other. It represents a phenomenal standard of behavior. God bless you all.”At the 11th hour, Bishop Tom Ely of Vermont told bishops that through a logistical snafu Resolution B016, which involved a 15 percent standard for diocesan giving to the larger church, got lost somewhere between the two legislative houses and likely would not be considered by deputies at this General Convention.“We passed this on July 9 by a substantial roll call vote and for some reason in the system it was not communicated to the House of Deputies,” Ely told bishops. “When I went to find out where this stood at the end of today when we were getting ready to adjourn we discovered it was not out into the House of Deputies yet.“We need to express this in as strong a way as we can,” he added. “We worked hard at that and the stewardship committee worked very hard at bringing back revised language to us that we supported strongly and without this mind of the house I don’t know whether we will communicate clearly our support for this resolution, so I urge us to adopt this mind of the house [resolution].”Bishops overwhelmingly approved the measure, as Ely had requested. The budget drafted by the Program, Budget and Finance Committee had assumed $73.5 million in commitments from the church’s dioceses (line 2), nearly $4 million less than that in the current triennium. That total is based on keeping at 19 percent the amount that the church asks dioceses to annually contribute to the church-wide budget. It was not immediately clear if deputies were able to vote the resolution before the close of convention.Bishops also rejected several resolutions attempting to postpone implementation of the Episcopal Church Medical Trust.The house also approved Resolution D067, which urges passage by Congress of the DREAM Act, which would provide a pathway to citizenship for undocumented youth and young adults. Other measures adopted included Resolution D055, urging the United States government to enact stricter controls on the use of carbon-based fuels, and Resolution A167, calling for creation of an “HIV Welcoming Parish Initiative” to help congregations to become more engaged with people living with HIV/AIDS.Bishops adopted Resolution D069, which involves a “social media challenge” calling upon every congregation to use social media in its current and future forms.Bishop Scott Hayashi of Utah urged passage of Resolution D093, affirming the ongoing work of the Office of Black Ministries as of “prime importance for us as a church” and the need for support for some struggling historically African-American congregations.Bishop Gregory Brewer of Central Florida expressed hopes of pairing earlier resolutions about how missionary enterprise zones might help create possibilities “to raise up new candidates for ordination among African Americans and Afro-Caribbeans. There is an extraordinary need … We are receiving a flood of Africans of Caribbean descent and many of the historic African-American churches are not doing particularly well. It’s a challenge for me as a bishop that I want to see grow and support.”They also adopted:A122, which calls the Standing Commission on the Structure of the Church to study the current budgeting process and matters of financial oversight and make recommendations to the 78th General Convention on possible changes;D066, approving creation of a network of retired Episcopal executives willing to assist dioceses and parishes, modeled on SCORE, a business counseling and mentoring organization;D023, which affirms that all Episcopalians are called to be evangelists to help grow the church and the kingdom of God and commends the work of the Office of Congregational Vitality and the Office of Emergent Church and Church Planting.Bishops concurred with deputies on Resolution D018, which called upon Congress to repeal federal laws, such as the Defense of Marriage Act, that discriminate against same-gender couples who are legally married in the states where that is permitted.The house also adopted Resolution D059, which urges a halt to the Immigration and Custom Enforcement’s practice of detaining people suspected of being in the country illegally without filing any charges against them, which it said leads victims of crime not to contact the police. It also decries racial profiling in immigration matters.Other resolutions adopted include:B028, urging Congress to modernize the nation’s refugee resettlement program;D005, which calls on the U.S. government to begin to use the term “criminals” for those who commit acts of terror rather than someone engaged in war;A015, commending democratic movements in the Middle East and North Africa;C119, calling for reduced air pollution in ports and greater rights for port workers;B023, calling for solidarity with the poor and indigenous people who bear great burdens because of global climate change, with special mention of the Inupiaq Community of Kivalina, Alaska, which is coping with rising sea levels;D087, urging efforts in job creation; andA040, urging Episcopalians to work for health care reform.–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Melodie Woerman, a member of the ENS General Convention news team, contributed to this report. Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET James Teasdale says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Richard Sellers says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 21, 2012 at 1:00 am I am overwhelmed by the amount of Political involvement I’m seeing from this Convention report. We ask the Government to pay heed to the Constitutional First Amendment separation of Church and State. Yet as a CHRISTIAN CHURCH you presented and adopted Resolutions such as:• D067, which urges passage by Congress of the DREAM Act.• D055, urges the United States government re. the use of carbon-based fuels.• D018, which called upon Congress to repeal federal laws, such as the Defense of Marriage Act.• D059, which urges a halt to the Immigration and certain Custom Enforcement’s practices.• B028, urging Congress to modernize the nation’s refugee resettlement program.• D005, which calls on the U.S. government to begin to use the term “criminals” – a “PC” issue.• A015, commending democratic movements in the Middle East and North Africa.• C119, calling for reduced air pollution in ports and greater rights for port workers.• D087, urging efforts in job creation.• A040, urging Episcopalians to work for health care reform.These are just a few of the issues which have our CHURCH telling the STATE what to enact or repeal at the EPISCOPALIAN Convention. There is no question that these are important issues to our country. But they are political issues which our CHURCH should leave in the hands of the STATE. We have enough to do WITHIN the church to keep it viable. This Convention took time to address all those issue yet somehow overlooked a Resolution B016, which addressed a change in the standard for diocesan giving to the larger church. That was PURELY Church business! Church members are politically as rigidly divided as the populace. Taking sides divides, alienates, and will absolutely separate this church.Prosperity, our free market system and the work ethic which made this country the best place in the world to live are all under attack. Those are huge and divisive political issues. Of course they affect us all, and as individuals; Christian, Jew, Muslim or atheist we should be involved with politics at whatever level our spirits move us. Christianity is under attack as well; prayer, the Commandments and crosses challenged. Our members are intelligent enough to join ALL Christians as they are so moved to take on the political aspect of these battles. The Episcopal Church in wisdom would be aware that a strong church, unified in the zeal to promote Christianity and Christian behavior WITHIN gives its membership a clear path to follow and promote. We in the trenches want to see our church provide a place of peace and Christian teaching; Christian support of our members and communities. This alone. Our free choice of political preference and involvement must be left to ourselves, left OUT of our churches.State & Federal political issues bombard our lives daily in every media form. The church should logically and theologically be above that. Infusing Church membership with politics, regulations and minutia like being green, global warming and immigration is to embroil us in uncompromising conflict, controversial “science” and legal chaos. For God’s sake, I hope you who lead this Faith can get on about teaching the word of Jesus Christ and the healthy growth of the church in the USA. Imagine how simple the agenda for next year’s Convention could be if it focused on church business and let politics and law be the business of Government. To encourage individual involvement is healthy. End it at that, please!Render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God, the things which are God’s. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA General Convention, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention 2012, Comments (2) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET House of Bishops Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books last_img read more

Anglican Church playing key role in tackling malaria in southern…

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Posted May 25, 2017 Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Africa, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Church playing key role in tackling malaria in southern Africa Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA [Anglican Communion News Service] The bishops of Angola, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe took part in recent World Malaria Day events along the shared borders between the four countries.As Southern African countries move closer to malaria elimination, increased community and church involvement is needed to identify and treat every last case of malaria, and to provide trusted malaria education on how the disease is spread and how to prevent it. Ministers of health emphasized the important role of the Anglican Church in ending malaria for good.Full article. Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

California: Bishop denounces Charlottesville violence, calls for non-violent resistance to…

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal Diocese of California] “With malice toward none, with charity for all…,” so President Lincoln wrote in his Second Inaugural Address, in 1865, with the devastating American Civil War not yet formally concluded. Mr. Lincoln’s ringing words fit with the commitment of Mahatma Gandhi and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as their leadership is properly, but too narrowly understood — a fundamental commitment to not making any person into an enemy. But the Mahatma and the Rev. Dr. King would have never stopped with the partial quotation, above, that we know so well; they would have also have gone on to say, with President Lincoln, “…with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right…”That is, at this moment we are clear that hatred of and violence toward people of color, of women, of the LGBTQ community, of the poor, of immigrants must be named as unequivocally wrong. The truth, as God gives us to see the truth, is that God is love, and all that is not love needs to be held up in the light of love, and opposed.For my part, I will, to the best of my abilities hold to the dual practices of not demonizing or making enemies of people, of holding to non-violence and the way of love, and at the same time of resolutely naming evil for what it is, and for resisting the wrong wherever it shows itself. Sadly, evil and wrong have, in these latest manifestations, wrapped themselves in the clothing of faith. The perversity of white supremacists appropriating the cross, a symbol of a very real instrument of torture and death used against a member of a subjugated people, a person of color, is beyond ironic — it is deeply distorted.Finally, let me say that all you who would walk the path of love and resist evil, please hear the admonition of Jesus of Nazareth — “Be wise as serpents and innocent as doves.” Too often those who choose the path of love are models of innocence but lacking in the prepared wisdom of the serpent.  In the coming days we will work with faith-based and civil society partners to offer training in non-violent resistance. Remember, Rosa Parks was not just a hard-working Black woman who was so tired that she determined, in the moment, to not move to the back of the bus. Rosa Parks was a woman who had prepared through months of training and was part of a close community of activists.Take hope — God does give us the light to see what is right. We see the right through the light cast by the lamp of history, through the wisdom of sacred writings, through the living examples of veterans of past struggles, such as Representative John Lewis, by the prompting of God in our midst, in our hearts. Let us heed the light and follow the right.The Rt. Rev. Marc Handley Andrus Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET California: Bishop denounces Charlottesville violence, calls for non-violent resistance to hate groups Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Aug 15, 2017 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Charlottesville, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more