CN House / Plus Line Design

first_imgSave this picture!© Cosmin Dragomir+ 41 Share Architects: Plus Line Design Area Area of this architecture project CN House / Plus Line Design ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/217673/cn-house-plus-line-design Clipboard “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/217673/cn-house-plus-line-design Clipboard Houses Romania CopyAbout this officePlus Line DesignOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesBucharestHousesRomaniaPublished on March 20, 2012Cite: “CN House / Plus Line Design” 20 Mar 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardBedsFlorenseBed – UpholsteredSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Qd-ClassMetal PanelsTrimoMetal Panel Finishes – ArtMeSkylightsLAMILUXRooflight F100 CircularWire MeshGKD Metal FabricsMetal Fabric in TransportationSystems / Prefabricated PanelsInvestwoodCement-Bonded Particle Board – Viroc NatureMetal PanelsRHEINZINKSeam Systems – Flatlock TilesSofasMenuDining Bench – EaveTablesArtisanCoffee Table – BloopMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamcenter_img Photographs:  Cosmin DragomirText description provided by the architects. This house is built on a 450 square meters lot, located on a former park in Bucharest. In order to preserve the rich vegetation of the park, as well as the general ambiance of the area, the architect and the beneficiary agreed to keep the highest possible number of the existing trees. As a result, three out of the four trees survived. They also determined the placing of the building, becoming determining factors, just like the general urban provisions.Save this picture!© Cosmin DragomirRecommended ProductsWoodEGGERWood-based materials in EGGER HeadquartersWoodHESS TIMBERTimber – GLT HybridWoodAccoyaAccoya® CanalsWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodAccording to the zoning planning, the building was a semidetached house attached on the East side. Combining the beneficiary’s desire to have a tiles wrapped wooden frame with the idea of having modern lines, led to three slopes roof concept, descending inwardly to a narrow area of a hidden gutter. This approach was acceptable to everyone, while creating generous and spectacular spaces on the second floor, where the indoors ceiling followed the oblique lines of the roof. Save this picture!© Cosmin DragomirThe layout of the house allows the technical basement, the first floor with a living room, kitchen, bathroom, a bedroom and a second floor with four bedrooms and two bathrooms. The second floor is extended over the first floor with a bedroom in a generous 3m cantilever, which offer the courtyard more space, while providing shadow to the lower level terrace. Save this picture!© Cosmin DragomirAn attractive element, which provides the flow between the two levels is the central placing of the interior stairs in the open space, with plenty of natural light on the first, and especially on the second floor. (large roof windows) The hallway of the second floor gains functionality as an adequate playing area for children. Save this picture!© Cosmin DragomirThe first floor has the same exceptional flow: the see-through fence and the empty spaces allow unrestricted view from one end of the property to the other. The high level of trust and partnership between the architect, client and constructor (builder) was reflected in the cost effectiveness of the investment. Specifically, the efficient use of the under average priced materials replaced more expensive solutions. Save this picture!plan 01The exposed concrete ceiling of the living room, the use of stained glass in the bathrooms, the attachment of the glass railing of the interior stairs by the edge of the concrete slab, the custom furniture, concealed and blended by the wall paint, the open spaces, with natural light are all available solutions, which once approved bring forth their strengths, giving an unique flavor to the color elements. Save this picture!plan 02A pleasant surprise was the fact that these characteristics were preserved during the next year, in which a young family with two children and the two grandparents lived in it. It is generally expected that within the first year of use (the time period between the finishing of the construction and the photo session) the home owners to add items that express their personality and functionality. That was not the case. After a full year of use, the house looked like a newly constructed building, except few toys in the playing area, which only added a fun touch.Save this picture!© Cosmin DragomirProject gallerySee allShow less”American City: St. Louis Architecture: Three Centuries of Classic Design” ExhibitionArticlesMuseum Nasional Indonesia / AbodayArticles Share CopyHouses•Bucharest, Romania Area:  317 m² Photographs ArchDaily Projects “COPY” CN House / Plus Line DesignSave this projectSaveCN House / Plus Line Designlast_img read more

Federation of Bakers launches revised flour dust guidance

first_imgSource: Getty ImagesThe Federation of Bakers (FOB) has published revised guidance on dust control in bakeries.Called Dust Control and Health Surveillance in Bakeries, it addresses what the Federation describes as one of the most significant occupational health risks in the bakery industry – respiratory exposure to flour and other ingredient dusts.The review was carried out by the FOB Health & Safety Committee, which includes representatives from all sectors of the bakery industry including the Craft Bakers and Scottish Bakers.The ‘blue book’ first appeared in the 1980s and was last revised in 2008. It has now been updated again and reissued as a PDF download available from the Federation’s website.It provides information and advice for bakers and others working in the food manufacturing industry which, if followed, will help them reduce risk arising from employee exposure to flour and other ingredient dusts, said FOB.Following the guidance will also help employers in the industry meet their duty of care for employees and contribute to ensuring health and safety compliance, it added. In particular, the guidance provides advice on how to assess dust levels in the workplace and outlines a range of practical measures which can be taken to reduce dust exposures as low as reasonably practicable.“I am sure that as before the revised guidance will be read and used throughout the baking and wider food industry,” said FOB chief executive Gordon Polson.“I would like to thank all members of the FHSC who have given many hours of their time to the review of this essential industry guidance.”The Federation represents the UK’s largest baking companies who manufacture sliced and wrapped bread, bakery snacks and other bread products. Its members include: Fine Lady Bakeries, Jackson’s Bakery, Roberts Bakery and Warburtons.To find out more about the dangers dust can present in a bakery, read our feature: ‘Dust: a danger that can’t be ignored’.last_img read more