Letters to the Editor for Sunday, Jan. 12

first_imgDestroying cultural sites is a war crimeOn Jan. 4, President Donald Trump tweeted that if Iran retaliates for the targeted killing of Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani, America will target sites important to Iranian culture.Let me be clear: It is a war crime to target cultural sites, according to the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. The United States is a party to that convention, meaning we must abide by it.The United Nations also regards destroying cultural sites as a war crime (U.N. Security Council Resolution 2347).War crimes are illegal under federal law (18 U.S. Code § 2441). The punishment is being “fined under this title or imprisoned for life or any term of years, or both, and if death results to the victim, shall also be subject to the penalty of death.”If President Trump goes through with his threat and attacks those cultural sites, he is a war criminal. Plain and simple.Daniel Wade IIIRound LakeMany share blame for Trump’s failuresWe need to get serious about climate change. We need to eradicate hate crimes and poverty. We need to build alliances, roads, bridges, healthcare systems and schools. Instead, we find ourselves in a useless fossil-fuel-sucking war that will kill, maim, destroy and deplete resources.Who is the most irresponsible?The 45th president? The military, which gave him an option it knew was terrible? (You don’t give a loaded gun to a baby and expect a good outcome.)  Or the American public and politicians who didn’t put an end to this presidency when they had a chance?Melinda PerrinNiskayunaWe all must learn to embrace differencesEvery year, people would like to accomplish some goals for the new year.Well I have a goal that I would like to see happen, not just in this new year, but year-around.This goal is that we as a human race need to understand that we are a very extraordinary human race and we all have our differences. We need to embrace them and learn from them instead of attacking each other.We are killing all of us with this hate. And yes, both sides, the left and the right, are at fault for all the hate that has been going around.But I strongly feel that if we as an extraordinary human race can embrace and accept our many differences, we can heal this nation and world. This is a goal that I would really like to see happen, not just this new year, but year-round.Anthony CarotaSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: No more extensions on vehicle inspectionsEDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsHIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people together Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionProps to Cuomo for canal, rail initiativesI rarely find any merit in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s initiatives, but I believe in giving credit where it’s due.Although it pains me, I compliment him on his recently announced initiatives: re-imagining the Erie Canal and high-speed rail between New York City and Buffalo.The Erie Canal made New York “the Empire State.” Making the Erie Canal economically and recreationally relevant, and high-speed rail along the same corridor, could re-invigorate the dead and dying Rust Belt communities along the way. They called the Erie Canal “Clinton’s Folly” when Gov. Clinton proposed it.When completed, it not only transformed New York but extended our country’s frontier westward, opening up new markets and opportunity. Good transportation does that. If you’ve lived in the Capital District long enough, I’m sure you marvel at what I-87 has done to Clifton Park and points north. Don’t give up, Andrew.Having said that, now that I have your ear, I’d like to add that Mr. Cuomo’s unwillingness to extend the authority to perform marriage ceremonies to federal judges simply because they represent the Trump administration is petty, spiteful, childish and vindictive. Behavior like this (not to mention the SAFE Act) is why I regard him as a jerk.George NigrinyGlenvilleRight on red isn’t mandatory, so chillI am the driver of a small Honda, and I choose to turn right on red when I think it is safe for me, my passengers and pedestrians.Due to the size of my car, it is difficult to see around snowbanks, larger cars and SUVs. Sometimes I will sit at a light until it is green in my favor.During these short waits, there have been more frequent displays of flashing lights, blaring horns and finger messages. I look at your face in my rearview mirror and you look so angry and wretched that I almost feel sorry for you.Draw a deep breath, count to 10, send mental good wishes to a friend. Before you know it, this little car will be safely on its way and so will you. Turning on red is not mandatory — it is a choice.Louise FarnumMaltalast_img read more

L.A. Dodgers pitcher Kenta Maeda’s latest win puts him in a class by himself

first_imgEllis said Maeda was able to adjust after one batter. That’s easier said than done, and Ellis credited Maeda’s athleticism for the quick adjustment.“He reminds me of Hyun-Jin Ryu, his athleticism. Zack Greinke, his athleticism,” Ellis said. “Those guys have tremendous feel for pitching. They make the spin do different things. They range their velocities — somebody like (Clayton) Kershaw who’s just coming at you. That bully who just keeps coming and coming and coming. These guys are going to mix and match, and pitch off feel, and trust their athleticism on the mound.”The Rockies put one runner on base via a walk until D.J. LeMahieu stroked a clean single to center field with one out in the sixth. Two more singles loaded the bases for Nolan Arenado and Gerardo Parra, the Rockies’ third and fourth hitters.Suddenly, there was a game at stake.“I had a four-run lead,” Maeda said. “I trusted A.J.’s demand for certain pitches. I executed.”Arenado, who hit 43 home runs last year, popped up weakly. Parra hit a dribbler back to the mound and Maeda flipped the ball to Ellis for the third out, his shutout preserved.Maeda got a big assist from left fielder Kiké Hernandez, who made a diving, over-the-shoulder catch to rob Tony Wolters of an extra-base hit in the fifth inning.The Rockies got their only run in the seventh on an RBI double by Brandon Barnes against Joe Blanton. The run was charged to Luis Avilan.The Dodgers got to Redlands native Tyler Chatwood (2-2) in the first inning, when Corey Seager singled, Yasiel Puig doubled, and Adrian Gonzalez poked a chopper over the pitcher’s mound to score Seager.In the second inning, Ellis turned on a knee-high fastball over the inside corner and crushed it to left field for a two-run home run. The home run was estimated at 445 feet, the second-longest by a Dodger player this season and Ellis’ first of the season.The Dodgers were still leading 3-0 in the sixth inning when Maeda helped his own cause. With Ellis on first base and one out, the pitcher was asked to bunt. He did, spinning out of the way of the pitch as the ball bounced back to the mound. Ellis reached second base and scored when the next hitter, Chase Utley, hit a double just beyond the reach of left fielder Ryan Raburn.Kenley Jansen pitched a scoreless ninth inning for his eighth save of the season in as many tries, and the 150th save of his career.For Maeda’s opponents, Saturday’s start added a page to his still-thin scouting report. The league still has five months and one week to adjust to Maeda’s machinations before the 2016 regular season ends.But the game also showed that Maeda can adjust quickly — in this case to the elements of elevation, and against a stout offense.“For 95 pitches you’ve got to be mentally tough to throw every pitch with conviction,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said, “and he did that tonight.” Then there are the other heralded Japanese pitching transplants, from Masahiro Tanaka and Yu Darvish this decade to Kazuhisa Ishii and Hideo Nomo before them. Four starts into his career, Maeda has outperformed them all.In fact, Maeda matched a major league record (since 1900) by allowing only one run in his first four starts according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Jorge Campillo, Fernando Valenzuela and George McQuillan are the only other pitchers to accomplish the feat.Among his peers, Maeda is in a category all to himself.“First time in this environment. First time pitching at Coors Field. First time against that offensive firepower they have over there,” Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis said. “I can’t say enough about what Kenta was able to do tonight. It was beyond impressive.”Maeda walked only one batter and struck out eight, a new career high. Like many pitchers, his slider and curveball didn’t break as sharply out of his hand, a caveat of pitching at elevation. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img DENVER >> One game at a time, Kenta Maeda is forcing his way out of every category he found himself in when he signed an eight-year contract with the Dodgers in January.Pitcher Scott Kazmir has a higher guaranteed salary this year, but Maeda has overshadowed him and every other free agent the Dodgers signed.Four other pitchers made the Dodgers’ Opening Day rotation, but with a few exceptions their performances have been dwarfed by the Japanese rookie. Maeda lowered his earned-run average to 0.36 by throwing 6 1/3 shutout innings in a 4-1 win over the Colorado Rockies on Saturday. He didn’t allow a hit until the sixth inning.There are other talented rookies in Major League Baseball this year, too, but again Maeda is having the better first month. At 21 years old, Dodger shortstop Corey Seager might well have a long and successful career ahead of him; right now he’s the second-best rookie in his own clubhouse.last_img read more