NFL pushes Congress for federal betting framework

first_img NFL pushes Congress for federal betting framework League calls for extensive restrictions on prop bets and data and age restriction of 21 The NFL has argued for restrictions on betting markets and a requirement for the use of official league data as part of federal regulations enforceable across the US in a Congressional hearing.Speaking at the ‘Post-PASPA: An Examination of Sports Betting in America’ hearing on Capitol Hill on Thursday, Jocelyn Moore, the league’s executive vice-president for communications and public affairs, called for new laws to limit wagers on prop bets, such as how many flags are thrown by referees or how many yards quarterbacks throw for.The NFL also wants a national sports-betting framework with substantive safeguards for consumers, as well as tools for law enforcement and standards to protect the NFL’s content and intellectual property. Moore also called for betting to be restricted to those over 21.While Moore stopped short of recommending overall federal oversight of sports betting, she advised that there should be federal policies in place to govern the activity.The Judiciary Committee hearing was the first to discuss the federal response to the repeal of PASPA in May, since when states such as New Jersey have unilaterally passed laws allowing betting within their boundaries.Moore said: “Without continued federal guidance and oversight, we are very concerned that sports leagues and state governments alone will not be able to fully protect the integrity of sporting contests and guard against the harms Congress has long recognised as being associated with sports betting.”The hearing is seen as the first step in examining whether federal oversight is needed in the new betting landscape, with committee chairman Bob Goodlatte calling the issue “ripe for consideration.” In his closing remarks, hearing chair Jim Sensenbrenner suggested that the federal authorities must have some involvement.“I think the one thing you all can agree on is for Congress to do nothing is the worst possible alternative,” he said. “So this means we have some work to do.”While some argued that the national, cross-state nature of sport meant a unified response was necessary, the American Gaming Association’s (AGA) Sara Slane said states had shown for some years they are able to regulate gaming effectively.Slane said: “Just as Congress has refrained from regulating lotteries, slot machines, table games and other gambling products, it should leave sports betting oversight to the states and tribes that are closest to the market. With such robust and rigorous regulatory oversight at both the state and federal levels, there is no need to overcomplicate or interfere with a system that is already working.”Putting the case for the industry, and reinforcing the argument for state-by-state oversight, Slane added: “I don’t think that there’s any panellist sitting here that would not agree this is a race against the illegal operators that are out there right now. They don’t pay taxes, they don’t care about consumers, they have no regulatory oversight or protections.”Nevada Gaming Control Board chair Becky Harris added: “States do a great job in every area including sports betting and we’ve just begun to see the roll out in other states. Nevada has a comprehensive regulatory structure that has been refined over decades, and we have a lot of integrity in our process.”Jon Bruning of the Coalition to Stop Online Gaming, which is backed by casino tycoon Sheldon Adelson, also called on Congress to enact legislation to combat a ‘Wild West’ effect in the betting industry.He also called for the restoration of the 1961 Federal Wire Act, which effectively outlaws online gaming, claiming the authorities have “effectively abandoned” enforcement of the 2011 UIGEA. Email Address Legal & compliance AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwittercenter_img 28th September 2018 | By contenteditor Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Regions: US Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

Un grupo de diócesis quiere cambios en el plan de…

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Un grupo de diócesis quiere cambios en el plan de salud denominacional Las resoluciones abordan costos y predicen impactos New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 22, 2012 Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] Preocupadas por las realidades económicas que conllevan la implementación de un plan de seguro de salud para toda la denominación, al menos cuatro diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal están solicitando formalmente de la 77ª. Convención General —que sesionará en julio de este año— que cambie los términos del programa que ha de ponerse en vigor menos de seis meses después que la Convención concluya.La Diócesis de Nueva York Central ha presentado una resolución en la oficina de la Convención General para que la Convención difiera por tres años la fecha límite de participación fijada para el 1 de enero de 2013. La resolución también permitiría que esas entidades obligadas canónicamente a participar, adquirieran seguro de salud de otros proveedores además del Episcopal Medical Trust, [la agencia] afiliada al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia (CPF por su sigla en inglés) que ha sido designada para administrar el programa.La Diócesis de Ohio también ha propuesto una resolución a la Convención General para eliminar la ordenanza de comprarle el seguro al Medical Trust.La Diócesis de Carolina del Norte quiere que la Convención General exija un estudio “del impacto [que tendría] el acatamiento pleno de la Resolución 2009-A177”. Y la resolución haría que la Convención no le exigiera a ninguna diócesis adoptar las normas mínimas de costos compartidos para alcanzar la paridad entre clérigos y empleados laicos que contempla el plan hasta que la próxima reunión de la Convención en 2015 haya llevado a cabo un estudio al respecto.La Diócesis de Misurí Occidental solicita que la fecha de entrada en vigor sea suspendida y que la Convención instruya al Medical Trust  a crear “un solo plan nacional unificado para toda la Iglesia Episcopal sin variaciones en los costos de primas de una diócesis a otra, y eliminando de este modo las dramáticas diferencias de costos para seguros de salud semejantes entre diócesis y regiones de la Iglesia Episcopal”.Otras diócesis episcopales han aprobado resoluciones en que instan a cambios en el plan, pero no han llegado a presentar o a planear presentar “resoluciones C” en la oficina de la Convención General como han hecho las otras cuatro.Sumado a esto, miembros de la Cámara de Obispos que integran el grupo de las Diócesis Pequeñas han pedido al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia que contemple un cambio importante en el plan. El pedido se produjo después que funcionarios del CPF se reunieron con ellos en noviembre de 2011, según dio a conocer este organismo.“Aunque una sola tasa no forma parte de la resolución, a petición de la Cámara de Obispos, el Medical Trust está estudiando las implicaciones de una sola tasa sobre los costos de los beneficios de salud”, dijeron Frank Armstrong, primer vicepresidente y gerente general de Medical Trust,  y Laurie Kazilionis, vicepresidente para las relaciones con los clientes de esta institución, en una declaración por escrito que enviaron por correo electrónico a Episcopal News Service.Una decisión de la Convención General en 2009 suscita las preocupacionesLas preocupaciones expresadas están dirigidas a una decisión que hiciera la Convención General en julio de 2009 cuando, vía Resolución A177, instruye al Fondo de Pensiones de la Iglesia que ponga en vigor un plan de salud para toda la denominación (DHP, por su sigla en inglés) a partir del 1 de enero de 2013, cuyos beneficios han de ser provistos a través del Medical Trust. Parte de los fundamentos para esa decisión era que ese plan ahorraría dinero, mitigaría las inequidades entre empleados laicos y mejoraría el acceso de los empleados al seguro de salud.A partir del 1 de enero [de 2013], las diócesis, congregaciones (incluidas las catedrales, parroquias y misiones), así como ciertas agencias oficiales de la Iglesia están obligadas a proporcionarle beneficios de seguro de salud a todos los clérigos y empleados laicos que trabajen 1.500 horas o más al año (30 horas por semana) en las diócesis nacionales de la Iglesia (incluidas Puerto Rico y las Islas Vírgenes). Los empleados que trabajen 20 horas o más a la semana pueden participar voluntariamente conforme a las normas que sus empleadores fijen.Estos requisitos no darán lugar a un gran cambio en muchas diócesis.  A partir de enero de 2012, según el CPF, 93 de las 101 diócesis de la Iglesia en el territorio nacional, así como otras 45 agrupaciones están inscritas en uno de los 22 planes de salud del Medical Trust  que se ofrecen bajo el DHP. Esas inscripciones  se “basaron en el atractivo del producto y del precio”, dijo el CPF en la declaración. Setenta y ocho de esa 93 diócesis han estado con el Medical Trust desde antes de 2009.Conforme al plan, las diócesis toman sus propias decisiones respecto a qué planes de salud del Medical Trust ofrecen, si ofrecen o no beneficios de salud a parejas conyugales no casadas y si las escuelas, las guarderías infantiles y otras instituciones diocesanas están obligadas a participar.El Medical Trust es lo que se conoce como un plan autofinanciado de la Iglesia y es el proveedor de beneficios mediante su asociación con compañías de seguros de salud tales como Cigna, Kaiser, Aetna, United Healthcare y Empire BlueCross BlueShield. En la actualidad ofrece acceso en la red al 98 por ciento de los empleados de la Iglesia Episcopal en toda la nación, según el CPF. Los 22 diferentes planes de Medical Trust incluyen salud mental, oftalmología, programa de asistencia al empleado y beneficios de derecho a la salud. También se cuentan con planes de salud dental.Los empleados pueden optar si han de recibir beneficios de salud a través de una fuente lícita, tal como el empleo de un cónyuge o compañero/a, beneficios del servicio militar o cobertura de un empleador anterior.La Resolución A177 y el canon que la pone en vigor exigen que cada diócesis establezca una póliza de compartir costos que sea la misma para empleados clérigos y laicos con derechos. La póliza determina la cantidad mínima que una congregación debe contribuir como prima mensual para clérigos y empleados laicos  que reúnan los requisitos necesarios. Las diócesis que ya hayan instituido o formulado pólizas de compartir gastos han elegido opciones que oscilan desde obligar a que los empleadores sufraguen el costo total de un plan específico a exigir que todos los empleados paguen un porcentaje de cualquier plan o de un plan específico.La preocupación por los costos que conlleva la puesta en práctica del DHP se exacerba por el hecho de que la Iglesia también se enfrenta a otra fecha límite el 1 de enero de 2013. La Convención General de 2009 también hizo canónicamente obligatorio a los empleadores inscribir a todos los empleados laicos que deban trabajar un mínimo de 1.000 horas anualmente para cualquier organización de la Iglesia Episcopal en EE.UU. o cualquier organización o cuerpo sujeto a la autoridad de la Iglesia en un plan de pensión para empleados laicos auspiciado por el CPF. Las excepciones son los empleadores episcopales que ofrezcan beneficios de pensión a través de un plan de beneficios equivalente no auspiciado por el CPF y de las escuelas que ofrecen beneficios de pensiones a través de un plan de contribución definido de los fondos de jubilación para maestros y profesores, que se conoce abreviadamente en inglés como TIAA-CREF.La mayoría de los empleadores del clero de la Iglesia Episcopal tienen la obligación desde 1917  de contribuir al CPF para las pensiones de los sacerdotes. La tasa actual es de un 18 por ciento del paquete de compensación total del clérigo (salario, vivienda,  servicios públicos y reembolsos tributarios de la Seguridad Social). El sistema de pensión de los laicos requerirá una contribución máxima de un nueve por ciento, dependiendo del plan elegido.El CPF predijo en su informe de viabilidad a la Convención General de 2009 que la Iglesia como un todo podría ahorrar $134 millones en los primeros seis años (a partir de 2013) después que el plan de salud denominacional totalmente implementado reemplace el actual sistema de seguro voluntario y fragmentado.Jim Morrison, vicepresidente ejecutivo del CPF y funcionario jefe de operaciones de negocios riesgosos, le dijo a ENS en un comunicado que el plan para toda la denominación, que en la actualidad, antes de la fecha límite del 2013,  sólo se ha puesto en práctica parcialmente, ya ha resultado en lo que él llamó “contención de costos acumulativos”; es decir, ahorros sobre las tasas prevalentes de más del ocho por ciento o $34,5 millones del 2010 hasta el presente. El Medical Trust pudo negociar con los vendedores antes del comienzo formal de la implementación del PDS y de este modo  añadió $2 millones en ahorros en 2009. Él dijo que esos ahorros han pasado por aumentos de las tasas anuales más bajas de las diócesis participantes de 2009 a 2012.Armstrong y Kazilionis agregaron que el  Medical Trust está maximizando la contención de costos a través de una compra interdenominacional, “ejerciendo influencia en las negociaciones con los vendedores, y optimizando los descuentos de proveedores [de servicios] y farmacias.Morrison comparó el rendimiento del DHP a la experiencia de los empleadores en EE.UU. de 2010 a 2012, quienes, según explicó, vieron aumentar las primas de los seguros de salud en un promedio de un ocho a un 12 por ciento anualmente, mientras los aumentos del Medical Trust promediaron sólo de un 5,5 a un 5,8 por ciento anualmente durante el mismo período.Ejemplo de una diócesisLa experiencia de la Diócesis de Newark en empezar a implementar el DHP ilustra de alguna manera las inquietudes que están planteando algunas diócesis.El Comité Asesor del Obispo sobre Recursos Humanos  y Beneficios, propuso en septiembre que a las congregaciones de Newark se les exigiera pagar un mínimo de un 90 por ciento del costo de una cobertura sencilla para el plan de precio promedio que se ofrecía. La propuesta fue recibida con firme resistencia de parte del clero diocesano, quienes dijeron que el mínimo de costos compartidos reducía esencialmente sus salarios y los obligaba a pagar aún más para asegurar a cónyuges o parejas e hijos.La Rda. Stephanie Wethered, rectora de la iglesia episcopal de San Pedro [St. Peter`s] en Essex Fells, Nueva Jersey, dijo a ENS en una entrevista que no encontraba “ningún sentido empresarial o moral” en exigirles a todos los clérigos diocesanos que enfrentaran una reducción potencial de salarios o beneficios, o ambas cosas a fin de garantizar que un puñado de parroquias “hicieran lo correcto” y aseguraran a sus empleados laicos que tuvieran ese derecho.La parroquia de San Pedro cubrió completamente los costos de proporcionarle a ella (Wethered) y a sus cuatro empleados laicos de jornada completa, seguro de salud, de discapacidad a corto plazo y de vida, beneficios de pensión y una cuenta de ahorros de salud. Ella agregó que la parroquia compra su seguro de salud por menos dinero fuera del Medical Trust y en consecuencia ella se opone a la obligación de que los participantes compren el seguro a través de esa agencia.Un plan para presentar la propuesta del costo compartido en la convención diocesana de enero se archivó a favor de una convención especial sobre el tema el 9 de junio. Al anunciar la convención especial, el obispo Mark Beckwith dijo que hay “algunos problemas esenciales de justicia en brindarles paridad de beneficios al clero y a los laicos que trabajan para la Iglesia” y añadió que hay también “algunas importantes realidades financieras que deben considerarse”. Dijo además que la propuesta del comité había buscado un equilibrio entre lo que llamó “justicia y realidad económica”.Wethered le dijo a  ENS que ella está “animada” por recientes mejoras que el comité asesor le había hecho a la propuesta que se presentará ante la Convención. Si bien la propuesta del 10 por ciento de costos compartidos sigue estando sobre la mesa, el grupo ya ha propuesto formas alternativas de lograr la paridad en la financiación.En enero, la convención diocesana anual le pidió a la Convención General que retrasara la fecha límite de la implementación. El lenguaje se hacía eco de una resolución de octubre de 2011 en la Diócesis de Olimpia.Predicciones de consecuencias imprevistasLos que abogan por cambios en el plan no sólo se preocupan de que las formas en que las diócesis  fijen sus políticas de costos compartidos podría dar lugar a una efectiva reducción de salarios de aquellos a quienes sus empleadores pagan completamente sus beneficios en la actualidad. También sugieren que los empleadores  escogerán el estándar mínimo como el estándar máximo y en consecuencia sus beneficios se verán reducidos.“Es increíblemente ingenuo creer que [el liderazgo congregacional] no usaría ese mandato para liberarse de esa carga” que el costo del seguro de salud pone sobre los presupuestos durante “estos tiempos realmente difíciles en términos económicos”, añadió Wethered.Dos miembros de la Diócesis de Carolina del Este dijeron a ENS en una entrevista telefónica que las instrucciones de la A177 son económicamente agobiantes. Monty Pollard de la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo [St. Paul’s] en Greenville, Carolina del Norte, dice “no es que no nos importen nuestros empleados, sino que es un asunto de dólares y centavos” para las congregaciones que están tratando de ser “disciplinadas” en la administración de sus presupuestos.Dave Whichard dijo que muchos miembros de sus parroquias no pueden proporcionarles a sus familias el mismo nivel de cobertura que la diócesis dice que debe ofrecerse a los empleados parroquiales. “Uno debería tener alguna paridad allí también, me parece a mí”, él dijo.La convención  de Carolina del Este le ha pedido a su diputación a la Convención General que apoye los empeños por aplazar la fecha de implementación y hacer el plan “más verdaderamente denominacional al abordar asuntos tales como el número de categorías que establecen los costos de tal seguro y la falta de un solo grupo nacional de participantes”.De regreso a Newark, el Rdo. Thomas Matthews, rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Lucas [St. Luke’s] en Phillipsburg, Nueva Jersey, quien escuchó parte del debate sobre la A177 en 2009, dijo que los planes de implementación de algunas diócesis parecen estar usando las instrucciones de la resolución como “un botón de reencendido sobre cómo cubrir juntos a clérigos y laicos”. Él quiere ver que la reunión de 2012 de la Convención General estipule que la A177 no se proponía dar lugar a una “reducción de los beneficios [del clero] como un medio para extender beneficios al laicado”.La Diócesis de Misurí abordó específicamente esa inquietud durante su convención de noviembre de 2011 al decir que los empleadores de la diócesis “no reducirán  la cobertura existente ni aumentarán los costos de la cobertura existente para que los empleados acaten la A177.Matthews y Wethered sugirieron también, en palabras de Matthews, que “algunos laicos van a ver disminuidas sus horas [de trabajo] de manera que las iglesias no tengan que pagar por ello”, porque entonces caerían por debajo de la  definición de idoneidad.“Puede que tengan que reducir el número de empleados por cuenta de esos mandatos y eso es una vergüenza”, dijo Wethered.Y la Diócesis de Texas ha preguntado si la Iglesia debería cambiar su enfoque sobre el seguro de salud cuando Estados Unidos también está implantando una reforma en el seguro. Entre las conclusiones que un equipo de trabajo detalló en una carta dirigida a la diócesis en octubre pasado estaba la sugerencia de que en la Convención General de julio “se revisara seriamente” el plan de salud denominacional tendiendo en cuenta tanto “los costos como de la complejidad de la implementación” del plan y las implicaciones de la reforma de salud federal. El equipo de trabajo sugirió que la diócesis se abstuviera de tomar decisiones sobre la cobertura y contribuciones hasta después de la reunión de la Convención en julio.Una declaración del CPF enviada por correo electrónico a ENS decía que la Iglesia aún necesitará el Plan de Salud Denominacional para ayudar en la contención de costos independientemente de las reformas sanitarias federales. Armstrong  y Kazilionis dijeron que hay varias cláusulas específicas de la ley federal que pueden tener repercusión en la Iglesia. “Estamos trabajando con otras denominaciones  a través de la Church [Benefits] Alliance para determinar cómo los grupos que participan en los planes de salud Medical Trust pueden verse afectados”, afirmaron.Ellos también reconocieron que hay problemas “relacionados con el costo de vida, estándares salariales y  planes de beneficios que siempre han sido una inquietud para la Iglesia” y agregaron que el Medical Trust “alienta y facilita la comunicación en el nivel del liderazgo diocesano para abordar esto”.Morrison dijo en sus comentarios por e-mail que el CPF es “muy sensible a las preocupaciones sobre los costos en torno a la Iglesia” y reconoce que el paisaje económico había cambiado notablemente desde que se llevara a cabo un estudio de viabilidad antes de que se reuniera la Convención General en 2009.“Reconocemos que muchas diócesis, congregaciones e instituciones eclesiásticas están experimentando tensiones económicas  debido al estado de la economía de EE.UU., que ha declinado desde la última convención General”, afirmó.En esa misma declaración, Morrison dijo que él “no estaba seguro de que estas resoluciones serán recibidas en la Convención General, pero como agentes de la Iglesia Episcopal, respaldaremos el resultado, sea cual sea”.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es editora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img

Epiphany Church in Los Angeles seeks support in national preservation…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Ethnic Ministries Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC United Farm Workers founder César Chávez preaches at Church of the Epiphany, Los Angeles, in the 1960s. Epiphany hosted early meetings of UFW, and Chávez was a frequent visitor there. Photo courtesy of Church of the Epiphany[Episcopal News Service] Church of the Epiphany in Los Angeles, the oldest continuously occupied Episcopal church in the city and a cradle of the 1960s Chicano movement, has an opportunity to raise up to $150,000 for restoration work and needs Episcopalians and others to cast votes in its favor.Epiphany is one of 20 historic sites nationwide selected as finalists in a grant competition that launched Sept. 24, and it is the only Episcopal site in the running. Produced jointly by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Main Street America and American Express and backed by National Geographic, the 2018 Partners in Preservation: Main Streets program will provide a total of $1.6 million in preservation funding to the projects that receive the most votes from the public.Anyone can vote online up to once a day through Oct. 26. Each person may cast up to five votes per day; all of them may go to the same organization, so a participant may give all five daily votes to Church of the Epiphany. To participate, click here. Voters will need to create an account; there is no charge.Church of the Epiphany, Los Angeles, is pictured in 1913, soon after its new building, designed by Arthur Benton, was completed. The original church, designed by Ernest Coxhead – visible at left – became the parish hall. Photo courtesy of Church of the EpiphanyChurch of the Epiphany was founded in 1888 in what was then a middle-class white neighborhood of Los Angeles. English architect Ernest Coxhead designed the original Romanesque Revival church. In 1913, when the congregation outgrew the original building, architect Arthur Benton designed a new church in a mixture of styles that included Gothic Revival, Mission Revival and Romanesque Revival. The existing church was converted to the parish hall and incorporated into the new building. Although Epiphany is considered one of the city’s historic treasures, its buildings need extensive repair after more than a century of constant use.Epiphany’s neighborhood gradually changed in the 1950s and ’60s from white to Latino immigrants, and under the leadership of the Rev. John Luce, the church began to welcome its new neighbors. Epiphany became a Latino cultural center, where Mexican food, dance and religious practices were welcomed even as they were discouraged in schools and society.Luce, an East Coast-bred white priest, took on the cause of Chicano rights as his own as soon as he arrived at the church. “Father John Luce was our patron saint,” said Moctezuma Esparza, a community activist and filmmaker, quoted in an April 2018 story by Los Angeles public television station KCET. “He offered us his church, his basement for us to meet and to hang out. He took us on the march from Delano to Sacramento.”In the 1960s, Epiphany was the birthplace of La Raza, a newspaper for the Chicano movement; Luce provided space in the parish basement and bankrolled early issues.Epiphany also served as an early meeting place for the Brown Berets, a Chicano student activist group whose leaders trained at the Social Action Training center founded at the church by Luce.Church of the Epiphany celebrates its patronal festival on Jan. 6, 2013. Photo: Janet KawamotoUnited Farm Workers founders César Chávez and Dolores Huerta were frequent visitors to the church, which hosted some of the union’s early meetings and was for some years its Los Angeles headquarters. Epiphany was also a planning base for the 1968 East L.A. student walkouts and Chicano Moratorium, events that helped build Latino political and social influence in Los Angeles. Luce and his parishioners also were leaders in the establishment of the United Neighborhoods Organization, a community advocacy group. Church member and longtime Latina activist Lydia Lopez became its president.The church continues to be a center for activism on behalf of immigrants, workers and LGBTQ people, as well as a vital hub of direct services in its Lincoln Heights neighborhood. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2005. The Epiphany Conservation Trust was established soon after to raise funds to preserve the church and maintain its ministry. The potential $150,000 from the Partners in Preservation Fund would be an enormous boost, according to Epiphany’s current vicar, the Rev. Tom Carey.Dolores Huerta, center, co-founder of the United Farm Workers of America, was guest of honor at an Epiphany Conservation Trust gala in 2017. The church hosted many of the union’s early meetings and was for a time its Los Angeles headquarters. Photo: Janet Kawamoto“If we succeed, we’ll use the grant funds to rehabilitate the church’s basement, where much of the Chicano movement was organized,” said Carey. “The renovated space will house our health care and legal clinic programs, our People’s History Project and community meetings. The grant will also bolster a capital campaign already underway to not only preserve our history, but to keep Epiphany on the vanguard of redefining how the church as an institution can fuel social justice advocacy, service provision and cultural and artistic expression.”– Janet Kawamoto is editor of The Episcopal News, a publication of the Diocese of Los Angeles. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Epiphany Church in Los Angeles seeks support in national preservation funds competition By Janet KawamotoPosted Oct 2, 2018 Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Update on 2021 General Convention planning

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Update on 2021 General Convention planning Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Una carta a los episcopales del obispo primado Michael B. Curry y la presidenta de la Cámara de Diputados la reverenda Gay Clark Jennings.Estimados Obispos y Diputados:Cuando les escribimos a principios de junio sobre la necesidad de considerar planes alternativos para la 80ª Convención General, esperábamos que los meses de verano nos traerían más claridad sobre el curso de la pandemia y cómo podríamos planificar para 2021 y más allá. Pero a medida que pasa el verano, los totales de infección y muertos en los Estados Unidos están subiendo cada vez más alto, incluso cuando el virus ha sido controlado en otras partes del mundo. Seguimos afligidos por los hijos de Dios que hemos perdido a esta enfermedad terrible, por aquellos cuyas vidas y subsistencia han sido abrumadas, y por aquellos cuyos espíritus están sufriendo de largos meses de distancia física de sus seres queridos.En medio de esta devastación, sin embargo, varios informes brindan esperanza que el desarrollo rápido de vacunas y terapéuticas eficaces podrían cambiar el curso de la pandemia y dejar reanudarse varios aspectos de nuestra vida comunitaria. Porque la situación sigue tan incierta, todavía no estamos preparados para tomar una decisión sobre cómo y cuando celebraremos la 80ª Convención General. Pero gracias a los esfuerzos del grupo de trabajo que convocamos en mayo, estamos más cerca a saber cómo procederemos si no es posible reunirnos en Baltimore el próximo verano.En caso de que no podemos convocarnos de manera segura en persona el 30 de junio hasta el 9 de julio de 2021, aplazaremos la 80ª Convención General a 2022, colaborando con nuestros socios en Baltimore para determinar las fechas apropiadas. Durante el verano de 2021, celebraremos una convocación virtual de adoración y oración para ayudarnos a escuchar lo que le dice el Espíritu a la iglesia mientras preparamos reunirnos en la Convención General. Y para aprovechar el momento adaptivo que nos enfrenta, nombraremos comités legislativos de ambos diputados y obispos con suficiente antelación de las nuevas fechas de la Convención General, encargándoles a empezar su trabajo de manera virtual utilizando las nuevas destrezas en línea y de Zoom que todos nosotros hemos adquirido en los últimos meses.La decisión sobre cómo proceder es muy importante. Ambos vidas y millones de dólares en contratos de la convención están en juego, y no hay manera de saber lo que las condiciones de la salud pública y económicas prevalentes serán para el próximo verano. Pero en todo, nuestros valores primarios siguen siendo el bien común y la salud, seguridad y bienestar de las personas que viajarían a la Convención General y las personas que nos encontraríamos mientras viajamos y nos reunimos.En el otoño, reevaluaremos la situación de la salud pública y consultaremos de nuevo con epidemiólogos que nos han dado su tiempo y consejo tan generosamente. En octubre, esperamos pedirle al Consejo Ejecutivo su asesoría y consentimiento para nuestra decisión final sobre cómo procederá la 80ª Convención General, pero reconocemos que quizás no será posible finalizar nuestros planes tan rápido.Sabemos que la incertidumbre que continua sobre el horario de la Convención General hace difícil planificar los presupuestos y horarios para 2021 y más allá, pero esperamos que el entender el plan alternativo les ayudará a prepararse por lo que podría venir.  Representa nuestros mejores esfuerzos de amarse los unos a los otros como Jesús nos lo ordenó, lo que es nuestro testimonio más grande y llamado más alto.Fielmente,Rvdmo. Michael B. CurryObispo PresidenteRda. Gay Clark JenningsPresidente, Cámara de Diputados Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing General Convention 2021 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Back to Press Releases Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church Office of Public AffairsPosted Jul 29, 2020 A letter to Episcopalians from Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry and President of the House of Deputies the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings.Dear Bishops and Deputies:When we wrote to you in early June about the need to consider alternative plans for the 80th General Convention, we hoped that the summer months would bring us more clarity about the course of the pandemic and how we might reasonably plan for 2021 and beyond. But as summer stretches on, infection and death totals in the United States are climbing ever higher, even as the virus has been brought under control in other parts of the world. We continue to grieve for the children of God who have been lost to this terrible disease, for those whose lives and livelihoods have been shattered, and for those whose spirits are suffering from long months of physical distance from those they love.In the midst of this devastation, however, some reports offer hope that the fast-track development of effective vaccines and therapeutics could change the course of the pandemic and allow some aspects of our communal life to resume. Because the situation continues to be so uncertain, we are not yet ready to make a decision about how and when we will hold the 80th General Convention. But thanks to the work of the task group we convened in May, we are closer to knowing how we will proceed if it is not possible to gather in Baltimore next summer.In the event that we cannot convene safely in person from June 30 to July 9, 2021, we will postpone the 80th General Convention to 2022, working with our partners in Baltimore as we determine appropriate dates. During the summer of 2021, we will hold an online convocation of worship and prayer to help us hear what the Spirit is saying to the church as we prepare to gather at General Convention. And to make best use of the adaptive moment now facing us, we will appoint both deputy and bishop legislative committees well in advance of the new dates of General Convention, charging them to begin their work virtually using the new online and Zoom skills that we have all gained in the last several months.The decision about how to proceed is a weighty one. Both lives and millions of dollars in convention contracts are at stake, and we have very little way to know what the prevailing public health and economic conditions will be by next summer. But in all things, our primary values continue to be the common good and the health, safety and welfare of General Convention attendees and the people we would encounter while traveling and meeting.In the fall, we will reevaluate the public health situation and consult again with epidemiologists who have given us their time and advice so generously. In October, we hope to ask Executive Council for their advice and consent to our final decision about how the 80th General Convention will proceed, but we recognize that it may not be possible to finalize our plans that quickly.We know that the continued uncertainty about the timing of General Convention makes it difficult to plan budget and schedules for 2021 and beyond, but we hope that understanding the alternative plan will help you prepare for what might be in store. It represents our best efforts to love one another as Jesus commanded, which is our greatest witness and highest calling.Faithfully,The Most Rev. Michael B. CurryPresiding BishopThe Rev. Gay Clark JenningsPresident, House of DeputiesMirando hacia el futuro: Planificación de la Convención General 2021 – Actualización del 20 de julio Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Support for local daily targeted by shooting attack

first_img News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say MexicoAmericas Receive email alerts MexicoAmericas Reporters Without Borders has confirmed in a visit to the central states of Durango and Coahuila that they continue to experience a high rate of press freedom violations one year after journalist Eliseo Barrón Hernández’s murder in Goméz Palacio, in Durango.The drug cartels and Los Zetas, a paramilitary group that is in their pay, are the main instigators of the violence and threats against local journalists, who live in permanent fear. Last month, at least three local newspapers were the target of threats or reprisals that were directly linked to their coverage of organised crime.The Noticias del Sol de la Laguna newspaper immediately decided to stop covering crime after threats were made against one of its reporters, Javier Adame Gómez, on 20 May. The threats followed the publication of reports about an attack in Torreón in which eight people died.A few days later, Karla Guadalupe Tinoco Santillán, La Opinión’s correspondent in the municipality of Vicente Guerrero (Durango), received threatening messages by telephone warning her “not to get in our way.” The messages, which were typical of the kind used by organised crime, were prompted by an article she wrote about a series of kidnappings.The same week, on 30 May, gunmen burst into the home of another La Opinión journalist, but only his wife and children were present. The next day, another newspaper in the region, Express de Multimedios, was ordered to publish the photos of six decapitated heads that had been found that morning “or else the journalists will suffer the same fate.”Criminal code without effectAlthough the state of Coahuila amended its criminal code in May 2008, making murders of journalists punishable by a minimum of 60 years in prison with no possibility of remission, violence against the media continues. Two journalists were killed in May 2009. Carlos Ortega Melo Samper of the Tiempo de Durango was murdered in Santa María del Oro (Durango) on 4 May 2009. The body of Eliseo Barrón, a crime reporter for the weekly Milenio Torreón, was found three weeks later.Two more journalists were murdered in quick succession in the same region last year. They were Vladimir Antuna García of the Tiempo de Durango, who was found dead on 2 November, and Valentín Valdés Espinosa of the Zócalo de Saltillo, who was kidnapped in Coahuila on 8 December and was found dead the next day. “What’s new?” was the question posed by journalist Julian Parra Ibarra in an editorial published on 31 May to mark the first anniversary of Eliseo Barrón’s death (http://www.expresionhispana.com/La%20Laguna/A%20LA%20BÁSCULA/Ultimo/). A year after his murder and the arrest on 6 June 2009 of five members of Los Zetas on suspicion of carrying out the killing, the investigation has ground to a halt.“Is there anything positive we can derive from this sad story?” the editorial asked. “Are there any grounds for thinking his fight was not in vain?” Like the editorialist, who was a friend of Barrón’s, Reporters Without Borders comes to the same conclusion: “Nothing has changed and, worse still, no one says anything.”A long story of violenceNow commonplace, these threats against journalists are leading to more and more self-censorship. Whenever an article about the activities of organised crime is published in a regional newspaper, the author is putting his life, and the lives of his family and colleagues, in danger.This climate of terror is not new. Violent crime including kidnapping, which is now widespread, has been growing since 2007 and affects all sectors of the population. Rafael Ortiz Martínez of the daily Zócalo in Monclova (Coahuila), has been missing since July 2006. Onésimo Zúñiga of Noticias de El Sol de La Laguna was kidnapped for several hours by an armed group in April 2007.Dangerous speechThis sad state of affairs is not attributable to organised crime alone. It also concerns the authorities in states such as Oaxaca, in southern Mexico, where a second humanitarian convoy trying to reach the Triqui indigenous village of San Juan Copala had to turn back because of a lack of security guarantees.The armed attack on the first convoy on 27 April left a toll of two humanitarian activists dead and a journalist wounded (David Cilia of the magazine Contralínea). Ixtli Martínez, the Oaxaca correspondent if MVS-Radio and the Associated Press, sustained a gunshot injury during clashes between students on the campus of the Benito Juárez Autonomous University in the city of Oaxaca on 10 June.Finally, Reporters Without Borders regards the comments that interior minister Fernando Francisco Gómez Mont, the No. 2 in the federal government, made recently about journalists as inappropriate and dangerous. Gómez, who was interviewed by Reporters Without Borders during a previous visit in July 2009, accused journalists of “glorifying drug trafficking and speaking ill of Mexico” and said they were entirely to blame for their own fate in places such as the troubled border city of Ciudad Juárez, where the press is increasingly complaining of abuses and violence by the army.Reporters Without Borders is of the view that his comments increase the dangers for all of Mexico’s regional media and the lack or protection for journalists.A total of 62 journalists have been killed in Mexico since 2000, while 11 others have gone missing since 2003. Reports May 5, 2021 Find out more June 24, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Support for local daily targeted by shooting attack News Follow the news on Mexico Reporters Without Borders voices its solidarity with the staff of Noticias de El Sol de la Laguna, a daily based in Torreón, in the central state of Coahuila, which was the target of a shooting attack on 22 June. Gunmen opened fire on the newspaper’s officers shortly before noon, injuring the receptionist. More than 50 bullet impacts were found on the facade.The attack comes a month after the newspaper was accused of links to the paramilitary group Los Zetas in a video posted on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCFeE3JYrlU). The newspaper issued an immediate denial in open letter published on 21 May.“This shooting highlights the fact that it is not just journalists in the northern border regions who are the victims of violence in Mexico,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Durango and the neighbouring state of Coahuila, both of which we recently visited, are unfortunately typical examples of the climate of terror that organised crime has imposed on local news media. We hope investigators will quickly establish the motive and identity of those who carried out the attack on Noticias de El Sol de la Laguna.” The National Commission for Human Rights (CNDH) has just announced that it is about to implement measures to protect journalists. Reporters Without Borders is waiting to learn what the federal government, for its part, is planning to do in this extremely critical situation for media personnel.center_img Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Organisation April 28, 2021 Find out more 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Help by sharing this information RSF_en News May 13, 2021 Find out more to go further —————————-18.06.2010 – Local newspaper journalists, Mexico’s forgotten victimslast_img read more

Mayor calls for cross department approach to maximise floating offshore wind…

first_imgLimerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Linkedin WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick LimerickNewsMayor calls for cross department approach to maximise floating offshore wind opportunityBy Staff Reporter – December 8, 2020 158 WhatsApp Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Twitter Email Printcenter_img Previous articleLimerick Food Partnership to raise awareness access and supply of healthy food optionsNext articleHundreds of free car parking spaces available for Christmas in Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Shannon FoynesTHE Mayor of the City and County of Limerick, Cllr Michael Collins, has called for a cross-department taskforce to be put in place to realise the unprecedented opportunity for the Mid-West and Ireland as a whole from the floating offshore wind potential for the West Coast and Shannon Estuary.Welcoming a report published today by Gavin & Doherty Geosolutions Ltd. (GDG), which was commissioned by Shannon Foynes Port, that identifies the enormous scale of the opportunity, Mayor Collins said that first mover advantage is critical and we need to move quickly at regional and national level.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “As someone from West Limerick, we’ve been watching and waiting for some time for floating wind technology to be advanced so that the unrivalled wind potential off the West Coast, which we are all aware of, can be finally taken advantage of.It’s of particular interest to us here on the Shannon Estuary because capitalising on that opportunity needs a huge manufacturing and industry supply chain that, in turn, requires a deep-water port. The Shannon Estuary offers that with the deepest water access in Ireland and among the deepest in Europe.“It’s an incredible coming together and, as this report reveals, it’s handed us an opportunity to transform the regional economy, solve Ireland’s climate change targets and even turn Ireland into an energy exporter on a global scale,” he said.The Mayor said that the job creation opportunity for Limerick and the wider region from this is unprecedented but if we don’t go after it other nations will, with Scotland and Norway among the nations also positioning for this. First mover advantage, he said, is essential.“Ambition alone will not make this happen. Limerick City and County Council is happy to play its part locally, working with other local authorities in the region. That’s a given. But, what we really need is an interdepartmental approach to this, drawing from the likes of Environment and Climate Change, Finance, Marine, Enterprise, Transport and the Department of the Taoiseach.“Shannon Foynes Port deserves congratulations for pursuing this opportunity quietly over recent years and now it’s time for us all to get behind it.” Advertisement TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener last_img read more

Bustin for Badges raffle prize tickets now available

first_img Bustin for Badges raffle prize tickets now available By admin – April 7, 2018 WhatsApp Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Previous articleS.A.A.M donation driveNext articleTeen Challenge focuses on Jesus admincenter_img Facebook Local News 5th Annual Clay Shoot FundraiserThe fifth annual Bustin For Badges Clay Shoot event will take place on April 27-28 at Windwalker Farms in Stanton.This event benefits local law enforcement (OPD, MPD, ECSO & MCSO) and helps pay for much needed equipment and supplies.Raffle tickets are now available. First prize, 2018 Polaris Ranger 500 UTV, $9,000 value. Second prize, Sagebrush 21 Gun Safe, $2,900 value. Third prize, Howa 308 Rifle 20 inch Barrel Camo (includes scope & bipod), $1,135 value. There are a limited number of tickets and you do not need to be present to win.The raffle tickets can be purchased by dropping by the OPD front desk during regular business hours or by calling 432-335-3322.The cost is $20 per ticket or six tickets for $100. The raffle drawing will take place on April 28.For more information about the event, call 432-571-3462. Pinterest Bustin for Badges logo Twitterlast_img read more

Building More Inclusive Environments in Financial Services

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Diversity and inclusion are two different concepts, but they go hand in hand in creating a more inclusive environment for employees. Sheri Crosby-Wheeler, VP, Corporate Social Responsibility, Mr. Cooper spoke with DS New about the difference between these two concepts, and how Mr. Cooper is improving its inclusiveness.”Inclusion is being thoughtful about the different things that make up a person, and how things may impact them,” Crosby-Wheeler said.”At Mr. Cooper, we have started employee research groups where we are allowing employees to come together around different dimensions of diversity and not only help their fellow employees, but also help the company,” she adds.Mr. Cooper’s Resource Teams focus on four different areas: career development, community involvement, corporate contribution, and social connections. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Building More Inclusive Environments in Financial Services Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Investment, News Sign up for DS News Daily Building More Inclusive Environments in Financial Servicescenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: CFPB Aims for ‘Culture of Compliance’ in Finance System Next: Preparing for Debt and Delinquency Shifts in 2020 Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Diversity 2019-12-11 Seth Welborn December 11, 2019 1,689 Views Tagged with: Diversity Share Save Subscribelast_img read more

The Latest in Mortgage Forbearance Data

first_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago 2020-08-28 Christina Hughes Babb in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Latest in Mortgage Forbearance Data Home / Daily Dose / The Latest in Mortgage Forbearance Data Previous: COVID-19 Drives Suburban Migration Next: Single-Family Rental Investment Amid COVID-19 Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago August 28, 2020 2,627 Views Subscribe About Author: Phil Hall Sign up for DS News Daily Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Phil Hall is a former United Nations-based reporter for Fairchild Broadcast News, the author of nine books, the host of the award-winning SoundCloud podcast “The Online Movie Show,” co-host of the award-winning WAPJ-FM talk show “Nutmeg Chatter” and a writer with credits in The New York Times, New York Daily News, Hartford Courant, Wired, The Hill’s Congress Blog and Profit Confidential. His real estate finance writing has been published in the ABA Banking Journal, Secondary Marketing Executive, Servicing Management, MortgageOrb, Progress in Lending, National Mortgage Professional, Mortgage Professional America, Canadian Mortgage Professional, Mortgage Professional News, Mortgage Broker News and HousingWire. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The quantity of forbearances declined by 1,000 over the past week, according to new data from Black Knight Inc.’s McDash Flash Forbearance Tracker.As of August 25, 3.9 million homeowners were in active forbearance, or 7.4% of all active mortgages, representing $828 billion in unpaid principal. This level is unchanged from the prior week. Black Knight reported that 5.3% of all GSE-backed loans, 11.6% of all FHA/VA loans, and 8.1% of loans in private label securities or banks’ portfolios are also in forbearance.Of the homeowners in forbearance, 72% had their terms extended. While 23,000 fewer GSE mortgages had an extension during this period, there was a 10,000 increase in FHA forbearances and a 12,000 increase among portfolio/PLS held loans, respectively.Over the past 30 days, Black Knight reported active forbearances have declined by 171,000 (-4%), with the greatest decrease among GSE loans (-128,000, -8%), followed by FHA/VA loans (-23,000, -2%) and private/portfolio loans (-20,000, -2%).Black Knight’s data follows last week’s announcement by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will extend buying qualified loans in forbearance and several loan origination flexibilities until September 30. The original expiration date was set for August 31.The extended flexibilities also include offering alternative appraisals on purchase and rate term refinance loans, alternative methods for documenting income and verifying employment before loan closing, and expanding the use of power of attorney to assist with loan closings.“Extending these COVID-19 flexibilities helps keep the mortgage market moving and borrowers safe during the pandemic,” said FHFA Director Mark Calabria.The FHFA also joined with the Department of Housing and Urban Development to extend their respective foreclosure moratoria to all GSE-backed mortgages and FHA-backed mortgages through at least December 31. The previous moratoria were set to expire on August 31. The FHFA’s moratorium only applies to GSE-backed, single-family mortgages.  Print This Post Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more

Minister’s MacGill address cost 100,000 euro

first_img Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Minister’s MacGill address cost 100,000 euro By News Highland – August 6, 2010 Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Facebook Google+ Pinterest Newsx Adverts RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton center_img WhatsApp Twitter Previous articleSenator Doherty: Dole figures do not tell the full storyNext articleMan found dead in Bunbeg News Highland It has emerged that the Transport Minister used the government jet to travel to Donegal to address the MacGill Summer School in Glenties last month.Noel Dempsey, who flew into to Derry, addressed the school on ‘reforming the republic’ at a cost to the tax payer estimated at one hundred thousand euro.The transport minister used the state’s ‘Gulfstream IV’ jet for the journey from Dublin to Derry to attend the MacGill Summer school on July 19th.A garda driver had also been dispatched from Dublin to Derry to collect the Minister and take him across the border into Donegal.The jet waited overnight for Minister Dempsey in Derry as the next day, after his speech to the school, he had to travel to Dublin for ‘urgent government business’.It costs the state almost 8 thousand euro an hour to keep the jet in the air and 4,000 euro on the ground, these figures have been used to estimate a 100,000 euro bill to the tax payer for the Minister’s address to the MacGill Summer School last month. Pinterest Google+ Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson WhatsApp Twitter Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeylast_img read more